Going to the Chapel by Mary Jane Morgan


Going to the Chapel by Mary Jane Morgan
Publisher: Self-Publishing
Genre: Contemporary, Inspirational
Length: Full Length (217 pgs)
Heat Level: Sensual
Rating: 3 stars
Reviewed by Alstroemeria

Claire Coleman is mortified when a handsome stranger discovers her crying in a quiet country chapel—the very chapel where she was supposed to have married her high school sweetheart, and the place where she now hopes to feel her mother’s presence.

Custom builder, Sam McGinnis, has sworn off rescuing women in need. That is, until he finds a beautiful blonde sobbing her heart out in his almost-finished chapel. The woman is obviously in a world of hurt, and no way can he walk away from the heart-broken lady.

But will rescuing Claire put Sam’s own heart in jeopardy?

Going to the Chapel by Mary Jane Morgan was a very quick and easy read. Claire Coleman is your typical jilted lover who finds solace in Sam McGinnis, your typical bad boy who doesn’t want to settle down but has a heart of gold.

After Claire is dumped by her fiance’ and best friend, fate would lead her to the chapel where she would have been married, in which she meets Sam, the custom builder for the chapel. The reader can already see where this is going, but it doesn’t make it any less enjoyable to read.

The writing is steamy, without too much conflict. The scenes are realistic but not graphic, which keeps the reader quickly flipping the pages. I also enjoyed the other characters in the book, but wished there was more interaction with them.

I wish there was more conflict between the main characters. From my understanding there were at least a couple weeks of conflict where the characters would not see each other, but that was kind of described in a quick paragraph before it was mostly forgotten and the issues were resolved without much work.

I think tension is one of the main qualities of a romance novel. It was built up really great with restriction at the beginning, but a little more follow through with the rest of the story could have added a whole layer of depth that any reader would have eaten up.

I enjoyed how quickly I read this book. I didn’t beat my brains out waiting for the main characters to notice each other, and I also LOVED the back and forth change in perspective. It is interesting to get the perspective of both characters, instead of just being in the mind of one.

I would recommend this book to anyone who wants a fast read that satisfies a taste for a fun romance story. It was light and heartwarming, with just a bit of sexy. A very nice combination.

Life in A Supermarket Basket by Michael Evanichko


Life in A Supermarket Basket by Michael Evanichko
Publisher: Crimson Cloak Publishing
Genre: Contemporary, Inspirational
Length: Full Length (176 pgs)
Heat Level: Spicy
Rating: 3.5 stars
Reviewed by Alstroemeria

Vincent fidgeted as he waited in the ten-items-or-less lane, for he clearly had more than ten items in his dainty, little basket. As the line of impatient shoppers grew he was sure he’d be publicly humiliated for the sin of supermarket disobedience. The practice of stoning would resurface, only frozen Cornish-hens would be launched at his large frame instead of stones. If only he knew in a mere 7.34 minutes he’d be visiting the afterlife after being hit by a car, he would’ve checked his minor anxiety attack at the customer service counter.

As Vincent’s spirit rose above the mayhem, so too, did each of his purchased items, as each of them triggered a remarkable and occasionally embarrassing memory of his past. He was forced to examine his current state of unhappiness as he awaited answers to the lingering questions: Would his life end in the parking lot of his favorite grocer? Would he be accurate in the belief that heaven was non-existent?

Life in a Supermarket Basket contains elements of drama, suspense, romance and mystery, while narrated with sarcastic, comedic undertones by the protagonist, Vincent. It has elements of a Mitch Albom novel with touches of Augusten Burroughs-like humor. Each chapter is named after one of the grocery items, and begins with an illustration that foreshadows the events within the chapter. Life in a Supermarket Basket creates an environment completely relatable to a mainstream audience. Who hasn’t tried to sneak through the express lane with more items than allowed? Are heaven and the afterlife for real? And finally, we all have poignant food memories that piece our lives together like a puzzle.

Life in a Supermarket Basket follows the main character Vincent on his journey away from his average and sad middle aged life. After an accident at his local grocer, Vincent is forced to look back on his life in this humorous novel through the ghosts of grocery lists past.

The main character Vincent is a relatable man in his 40’s who has lost sight of what he really wants in life. As the reader travels with Vincent through his epiphanies of the past, an interesting picture is painted of a man who wants so much more.

Though the editing was a bit off at times, it did not take away from this oddly inspirational journey. References to religious beliefs were realistic and not at all preachy. This is not a conventional story about life and life after death, but rather it urges the reader to continue the journey through many strange and exciting twists.

The humorous quality of this fiction novel is definitely found within the pages. With Vincent there is no hiding the gritty details of life, and it is refreshing to see that one man’s discovery of soy milk can be another man’s discovery of self-worth.

A puzzle that comes together piece by piece, Life In A Supermarket Basket lived up to it’s excellent description. I would recommend this novel to anyone who wants a witty read that wraps up eloquently. No ends are left untied and it may just give readers their own grocery store epiphanies.