Lie to Me by J. T. Ellison


Lie to Me by J. T. Ellison
Publisher: MIRA
Genre: Suspense/Mystery, Contemporary
Length: Full length (416 pages)
Rating: 4 stars
Reviewed by Ginger

They built a life on lies

Sutton and Ethan Montclair’s idyllic life is not as it appears. They seem made for each other, but the truth is ugly. Consumed by professional and personal betrayals and financial woes, the two both love and hate each other. As tensions mount, Sutton disappears, leaving behind a note saying not to look for her.

Ethan finds himself the target of vicious gossip as friends, family and the media speculate on what really happened to Sutton Montclair. As the police investigate, the lies the couple have been spinning for years quickly unravel. Is Ethan a killer? Is he being set up? Did Sutton hate him enough to kill the child she never wanted and then herself? The path to the answers is full of twists that will leave the reader breathless.

The suspense starts from the first page and continues onward. A mystery intro with a warning, a body being found and then Sutton Montclair has left her husband Ethan a note that she needs time away and don’t look for her. Why did Sutton leave? Will Ethan be able to find her? Who is the sinister voice?

The opening quote “Chaos is a name for any order that produces confusion in our minds” takes on a whole new meaning by the time you finish this book and reflect back on the events. When you get to the end of the book the pieces will come together. It appears that Sutton and Ethan have a strange and strained relationship. There are secrets that should have been revealed before marriage. The chapters alternate from events that are happening now to past events. The plot has many twist and turns with a lot going on. I feel as if the book was so long. I think the beginning half of Ethan’s story was too long while the second part of the book was quick and to the point.

The main character was Sutton; her friends, her past, her family – all about her. There was little mentioned about Ethan but his voice gave him weight in the story. I ended up liking Ethan. He wasn’t perfect and was man enough to admit his wrongs even though he had reason to dispute or not claim his misdoing. Things aren’t always what they appear. At first I thought Sutton and Ethan had a weird relationship of secrets and arguments but as the story is told I knew that Ethan loved Sutton and that he wanted a family with her. Sutton was naive and too open to sharing information. This fault proved to be a part of the breakdown in their marriage.

I figured out who the antagonist was early on in the story but there was more to solve in the puzzle. The ending was not predictable. The book is excellently written, and the plot is well planned and staged out. A sinister plot of revenge and planning to get back at those that have been wronged. Each chapter delivers more clues to bring the reader closer to solving the mystery.

I enjoyed the police women Officer Holly Graham and Inspector Amelie Badeau. They were fair and both were interested in the facts and not going by what was implied. They both worked off of the clues and logic. Officer Graham was up for promotion but instead of calling the case closed she continued to work the case to solve it.

My book club members enjoyed the book and so did I. This is highly recommended for those who enjoy suspense with lots of twist and turns.

Next of Kin by James Tucker


Next of Kin by James Tucker
Publisher: Thomas & Mercer
Genre: Contemporary, Suspense/Mystery, Action/Adventure
Length: Full length (337 pages)
Rating: 5 stars
Reviewed by Ginger

A New Year’s Eve celebration begins with the pop of a champagne cork—and ends with the bone-chilling screams of a killer’s victims. Ten-year-old Ben Brook is the lone survivor of the brutal murder of his wealthy family at their upstate New York compound. But from the moment he evades death, Ben’s life is in constant danger. Can NYPD detective Buddy Lock keep the boy safe from a killer intent on wiping out the entire Brook clan?

When two more massacres decimate the Brookses’ ranks, Buddy’s hunt narrows. But his challenges grow as power, money, and secret crimes from the family’s past stand in the way. With Ben more and more at risk, Buddy steps closer to the edge, forcing a relentless killer to become more brazen, brutal, and cunning. Saving the boy will put all of Buddy’s skills to the test…and risk the lives of everyone he loves.

This is a book that I thoroughly enjoyed from page one to the end. Very well written, a plot that is full of suspense and an unpredictable ending.

Ten-year-old Ben Brook is the lone survivor of the brutal murder of his wealthy family and New York Police Department Detective Buddy Lock is the one that is called to duty to protect Ben from a killer who is intent on wiping out the entire Brook clan. As long as the killer is still on the loose more massacres of the Brook’s family are happening and Ben and those around him are in danger.

I enjoyed the bond that Ben developed with Mei, Buddy’s girlfriend, but I felt that their bond developed way to quick. Buddy wasn’t around Ben that much but Ben quickly developed a fondness and need for Buddy. Ben is stated to be ten years old but by his actions his age seemed to be younger.

I like the formatting of short chapters. The author providing the character’s back story did help with the development of the characters and also helps develop a connection for the reader. The author didn’t delve into too much detail but gave enough insight.

The suspense starts from the first page and continues onward. For me the ending was not predictable. The book is excellently written, and the plot is well planned and staged out. The book kept my interest; the murders kept happening and Ben’s life was constantly in danger. Each chapter delivered an intense page turner bringing the reader closer to solving the mystery. This is an action oriented plot that did have a few instances that seemed unrealistic but still gave the story conflict to keep the level of suspense going.

I enjoyed how the author tied in the story with the Holocaust survivors and victims. Reading this brought something extra to the story and gave it realness by making it seem the events could actually be true.

I am looking forward to the next book in the series.

Seize the Day by Curtis Bunn


Seize the Day by Curtis Bunn
Publisher: Strebor Books
Genre: Contemporary
Length: Full Length (289 pgs)
Heat Level: Spicy
Rating: 4 stars
Reviewed by Ginger

When a terminally ill man is at a crossroads, one choice will make him feel more alive than ever.

Calvin Jones has finally gotten his life on the right course. At forty-five, he has escaped a toxic long-term relationship with the mother of his only child, and he loves his job as a high school English teacher in Washington, DC. Life is good. But then life turns horribly bad. A routine checkup reveals a cancerous spot on his pancreas. The oncologist offers him chemotherapy in the hope that it will extend his life, but Calvin declines…and decides to live the best he can while he can.

Seize the Day is more than the story of Calvin Jones’s decision to pass on cancer treatment. It is the inspiring story of a man choosing not to wait on death and, instead, to live out his life with courage, hope, and resilience. What happens next is extraordinary.

“I keep living because I could be dying.” Calvin Jones wasn’t a bad guy. In fact he is a wonderful father, a committed high school English teacher and a great friend. After receiving a horrible diagnosis of stomach cancer, 45 year old Calvin seems to see life differently. After being given a short life sentence how should a person act? Would they give up, shut out the world and blame everyone for their medical condition? No not Calvin. He decides to live the best life he can. He starts to see life differently and do things he normally wouldn’t do. I like that this story is told from a man’s point of view and to see that he has feelings and he is not afraid to show emotions. It is obvious that Calvin is hurting but he still wants to make a positive impact on those that he meet.

This is a touching read where I found myself stopping several times to soak in the words of wisdom, pondering the feelings and emotions that Calvin must have been feeling.

Calvin is so transparent in his feelings. He admits the confusion that he had at a young age for the woman that he loved. He appreciated those that brought subtle influences into his life and he in turn tried to be of servitude to others. The balance between Calvin’s hurt and dealing with his hurt was so heart warming. I enjoyed that the book gives life lessons. Life is a daily gift and this book is an example to everyone on living life with meaning and substance. We shouldn’t hold on to grudges, that family is important and with life being so short we shouldn’t stay where we aren’t wanted. Everyday that we have is a day of strength of not giving up. Calvin is a strong character that took his diagnosis and held on to hope and didn’t allow his cancer to turn him into a bitter person but more so made him more open and loving.

At first I was confused by the ending but as I gave it more thought I appreciated how the author decided to give Calvin closure. From reading the book we know the outcome for Calvin so the book didn’t really have to spell out his ending. I took it as him in his element of happiness and being around those whose life he has touched. This is highly recommended especially for those who are having a hard time seeing the brighter side during life’s storms.

Bitter Blues by Ursula Renee


Bitter Blues by Ursula Renee
Publisher: The Wild Rose Press
Genre: Historical
Length: Full Length (188 pgs)
Heat Level: Sensual
Rating: 4 stars
Reviewed by Ginger

Despite their different backgrounds, Randy Jones agreed to take Cassie Ann Porter for better and for worse. He never considered how much worse things could get, but he finds out after he returns home from serving in the army during World War II. Unable to find a job, he has to depend on his wife to support the family, which includes their two daughters, who at first refuse to have anything to do with him.

Cass works at the shipyard, one of many women employed to fill in while the men were gone to war. Her employer doesn’t replace her and the others because he can pay them so much less than he would men, yet she would like nothing better than to be a stay-at-home wife and mother.

When a good intention goes wrong, Randy wonders if he and Cass have made a mistake in going against society’s rules. Can the “worse” ever get better?

Oh how a new relationship can start out like sweet jazz. The swaying of your heart, and the rhythm of the emotions but then the tapping of life’s reality may eventually reveal to you how easy it is for the rhythm change the tune to the bitter blues.

In this sequel to Sweet Jazz, Cassie Ann Porter and Randy Jones are now married with children. Will they allow society’s convention on their marriage to turn their music to bitter blues?

There are many risk when one is involved in a mixed race relationship. There is a risk in losing their relationship with their family and friends, and possibly even the relationship that they may have with their children. It is a sacrifice but also can bring about a stronger unity to the family.

I enjoyed the author’s writing style, which includes small details that help the reader see and visualize the characters as well as the scenery. Cassie and Randy are likable character’s and they are also a lovable couple to read about.

Cassie and Randy’s marriage is believable. They are dealing with issues such as lack of communication, lack of finances and they also have a misplacement of love that bonding connection that comes after a couple has been apart.

I wanted Cassie to give Randy a break. He has a lot of adversities going against him. He served his country and now he’s home and isn’t able to be a provider to his family. Right now Randy’s focus is to find a job that will offer stability and support. His love for music and playing the saxophone seems to be what he holds on to but sadly in the beginning of the story he doesn’t even play. I am all for a man being a man, being that supporter but I also believe everyone should enjoy life and have something they enjoy that brings them happiness.

I wanted to see that closeness and bond of the two back on stage or even in their own home but with Cassie so scared to publicly acknowledge Randy as her spouse after all of the sacrifices that he has made to be with her. She has her family and loved ones but Randy doesn’t have anyone else. Not only does Randy feel less than a man in his own home, but to add to his worries his daughters do not have a closeness with him. I couldn’t help but feel sorry for Randy. His love and protectiveness as a father hindered his thinking when he took his daughter to the nearest doctor. Randy’s eyes do not see color or racial barriers. He functions off of love and, though this is a good thing, Cassie doesn’t see the outcome as such. She is worried more about the repercussions or the outcome if their relationship is known publicly.

I don’t want to reveal too much of the story so I’ll say I did enjoy the book. I liked that the author did a sequel to Sweet Jazz so that the readers can follow Cassie and Randy to see where life lead them and how they faired. This is a realistic plot that a lot of people can relate too and even if they can’t relate to the characters and their position in the story they can learn a lesson of looking for the good in what people do, seeing their efforts and not just the outcome that couldn’t have been foreseen when they are doing something out of love, and not malice.

This is an enjoyable read that I do recommend.

Grand Opening 2 by Carl Weber


Grand Opening 2 by Carl Weber
Publisher: Urban Books
Genre: Contemporary
Length: Full Length (288 pgs)
Rating: 5 stars
Reviewed by Ginger

The year is 1978, the Duncan brothers and their tough-as-nails women have vanquished their rivals and taken their place as the leaders of Waycross, Georgia’s criminal enterprises. However, their rise to power has not gone unnoticed, and the family is rocked when their mother, Ms. Bettie, is kidnapped and her body is found in a swamp.

No one knows who the killers are, but instead of drawing closer, the family is split when their grief-stricken leader, LC, is offered membership in the South’s most powerful black organization, the Council. Membership has its privileges, but they do not include his brothers. LC packs up his growing family and moves to Atlanta to open his first car dealership.

Unable to deal with his mother’s death, Lou Duncan searches for her killers with the help of an unlikely ally—LC’s ex-fiancée. Her presence may cost him his relationship with his brothers, but Lou is resigned to that fact because Donna’s help is instrumental in finding Ms. Bettie’s abductors. What he will soon learn is that his search for the truth will also lead him to discover a long-buried Duncan family secret.

I love the Duncan clan!

The characters are so real and each has their own personality and brings something interesting to the story. The writing is so well crafted that each individual’s personality makes the character seem so alive it’s as if they are interacting with the reader. The oldest Lou, Levi the big guy but a gentle teddy bear, unpredictable Larry and LC the brains of the brothers…I loved them all.

The author never disappoints and always delivers a plot that is entertaining and keeps me wanting more. This title was just as good as the previous titles. Reading about the beginning of the family helps the reader to understand and get to know the characters in depth for the stories that follow. The plot and the story line is consistent. There are a few typos in the beginning but to be honest after the kidnapping I didn’t notice if there were any typos because my focus was more on the actions in the book.

The plot is interesting all the way around. The suspense of who took the Duncan’s mom and what is the deal behind The Council made this an awesome read. The Duncans are family men and brothers that stick together through it all. They are strong men that marry and have strong women by their side. I look forward to reading more about the Duncan family.

I enjoyed reading this book and I highly recommend for readers that enjoy interesting suspense reads.

Drunk on Men, Vol 1 by Afton Locke


Drunk on Men, Vol 1 by Afton Locke
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Historical
Length: Short Story (143 pgs)
Other: M/F
Rating: 4 stars
Reviewed by Ginger

You may think it’s sloe fizz gin
But honey we’re sober, just drunk on men

When three African-American women meet at a resort on the Jersey Shore in the 1920s, they say goodbye to their old lives. Finding men as intoxicating as bootleg liquor, they pin their futures on happily ever after. But love can be worse than a hangover when the men’s flaws threaten to destroy them.

Hannah knows it’s time to replace her fiancé who died in the war, but the abrupt white man who rescues her from rough surf hardly fits the bill. Belle longs to ditch her latest meal ticket, but is the rich African-European owner of an upscale hotel out of her league? And while Edie struggles to face her upcoming arranged marriage, a rugged Hispanic-white fisherman decides to stake his own claim on her.

Three women from various walks of life meet at Wilmott Hotel. Will this bond of friendship bring about a strength that gives each woman needed courage to step outside of their individual comfort zones?

This is an enjoyable read with an interesting plot. The characters are likable and have a sisterly bond that gave me a feel good comfort. The bond of the trio felt like they could be my sisters or long time friends. The storyline flowed and kept my interest.  The women are all quite different, with Belle Longstreet who is from the street of Camden, New Jersey, Hannah Williams, who is on this trip as a gift from her family member (this is out of the normal for her coming from her farm life) and Edie Childers came to Ocean Promenade to marry the man who was chosen for her by her parents.

The women were strangers but, due to a hotel fire alarm, the women find themselves in the same area of the hotel. Though each woman comes from a different background, the connection between the three ladies was a delight to read. Seeing their individual strengths being shared while also watching their fondness for each other grow is something that is rare these days. With all the reality shows on television of women screaming and going against each other this was a refreshing read. And though it seems the common thing between the women is seeking love of a man this did not cause any drama or arguing. The innocence of first encounters with the men makes for an interesting read, leaving you wondering if they’ve met the right man.

This is a quick read that brings about incredible women telling a good story of their life to each other. Their combined personalities help each woman find her strength and voice. They may have been through the bad, but their story shows that strength can come from numbers. They each have hurdles to cross but the author clearly shows that they don’t have to accept their fate but they can change the path that was laid for them. I enjoyed reading about their courage in how they didn’t let society determine who they should love.

I enjoyed the delightful story of Belle, Hannah and Edie and watching their friendship blossom. I look forward to the second volume of the series to see where the journey will lead the ladies.

Half-Built Houses by Eric Keller


Half-Built Houses by Eric Keller
Publisher: Rogue Phoenix Press
Genre: Contemporary, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Full Length (320 pgs)
Rating: 5 stars
Reviewed by Ginger

Charley Ewanuschuk has been mistreated all his life and now survives as a ghost, moving through society as unnoticed as possible. However, when a murder occurs behind the half-built house he is squatting in society takes notice of the introverted homeless man as he becomes the prime murder suspect. Brian Cox managed to charm his way into a good job in a national law firm but, when the recession hit, he learned that charm is a disposable commodity. Fired by the firm and forced to take on Legal Aid files to pay the bills, Charley’s murder trial becomes Brian’s first major case. However, this will be no straightforward case. As the trial progresses it becomes apparent forces are working behind the scenes to ensure the homeless man takes the fall for a crime. Told from the point of view of the accused, the lawyer, the detective and the manipulator, Half-Built Houses provides all the thrilling intrigue, clever ingenuity and interesting individuals readers have come to expect form classic courtroom dramas.

I am one to cheer for the underdog and when Charley Ewanuschuk, a homeless man who has a history of being picked on and is accustomed to being classified as the less fortunate, I find myself cheering for his innocence to be proven. Will legal aid attorney Brian Cox be able to prove that Charley isn’t a killer?

I enjoyed every part of this book. The author’s writing style, the realness of the characters and definitely the plot structure. The vivid accounts told with liveliness and intensity makes this an astonishing read that I didn’t want to put down. Charley is a homeless loner who has minimal skills in communicating. At the end of his work day he finds solace in a half-built house. It was touching how the author described Charley’s feelings in how such a small space of four walls in the basement of an unfinished home could make Charley feel human and like a man. There was something about Charley’s life, his struggle that drew me in, that made me empathize with him and his situation. Brian doubted Charley’s story but as he got to know him he too started to cheer for the underdog. It finally felt like someone was on Charley’s side, that he had someone to look out for him. Charley having someone to speak for him and fight for him made me cheer even more because this meant Charley had a chance.

As Brian digs into Charley’s past the story builds in intensity and as the case unfolds the climax reaches a high point. The wealthy have a means to protect themselves and their own. Even though Jason was the last person seen with the deceased female, and the circumstances make him look like the guilty party, Jason’s father Hugh Young pulled out all the stops to cover and protect his son and their family name from being mentioned in this murder. As Hugh tries to cover up Jason’s involvement the conflict rises. The twists and cover up helps build a strong suspense. The author exemplifies skillful storytelling in this moving novel that kept my attention from page one until the very end. This is absolutely a book that I will remember for a long time to come.

This is a warning that once you start reading you may not be able to put the book down. If you enjoy suspense this book will not disappoint. This is a title that you definitely don’t want to pass up.

Hear Me Roar by Joy Smith


Hear Me Roar by Joy Smith
Publisher: The Wild Rose Press, Inc
Genre: Contemporary, Mystery/Suspense
Length: Full Length (273 pgs)
Rating: 3 stars
Reviewed by Ginger

Jan Simmons never expected trouble to move into her quiet Charming Way cul-de-sac. Nor did she expect her husband Jeff’s weakness for fast money to drag their once happy family into danger.

When her husband turns to crime, Jan, a people-pleaser with little self-worth, must release the death grip she has on her failing marriage for the sake of her children and draw on her inner strength.

As Jan fights to free her family from a web of lies and deceit she also battles to save herself.

Life can give us the unexpected, but when your husband turns to living a life breaking the law what does a wife do? Jan Simmons has a lot she is dealing with. It’s hard when her husband Jeff, the breadwinner of the household, lost his job and has to take a lesser paying job. I am not sure if the loss of his job ignited this change for the worst in Jeff, but this is the path he is traveling…a bickering, cheating drunk. Jeff is a character that I found very unlikeable. His priorities never seemed to be on his family and as the story goes on he gets caught up in a web of a mess and loses all sight of being a family man.

I enjoyed the author’s style of writing, but the story starts out slow. There wasn’t anything exciting about the life of a stay-at-home mom tending to kids, baking and conversations with other stay-at-home moms.The lack-luster husband who shows signs of a second life helped give the story something to look forward to. It’s a predictable story that was drawn out too long.

The new neighbor to Charming Way, Frank Carlucci (Digiorno) brought interest to the storyline but left me wondering why did he only have one card game at his house and why did he let Jeff accrue such a debt which in turn set the stage for Jeff to veer down his path of lawlessness.

Even though the story told of mafia behavior with drug dealing and kidnapping there wasn’t really any action. The story tells of a kidnapping but doesn’t show the events. I would have liked to have read the action. There were more details shared on the mom’s day than there were on the action details that must have taken place during the kidnapping and the trouble Jeff was involved in.

Jan didn’t start out as a strong woman but she eventually saw she had to provide for her family and protect their lives from the life her husband started to bring home. I like that Jan is a survivor and a fighter. She always kept her children’s best interest in mind. Maybe her growth and strength is the reason behind the title. Jan evolves from a housewife to finding her footing to being a business owner and mom of two.

The story is well written. It shows the courage of a woman taking charge of her life and the livelihood of her family. If you enjoy reading stories of women and their growth into a strong lioness be sure not to miss Hear Me Roar.

Mothers and Other Strangers by Gina Sorell


Mothers and Other Strangers by Gina Sorell
Publisher: Prospect Park Books
Genre: Contemporary, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Full Length (320 pgs)
Rating: 5 stars
Reviewed by Ginger

Voted BoM by LASR Readers 2013 copy

“My father proposed to my mother at gunpoint when she was nineteen, and knowing that she was already pregnant with a dead man’s child, she accepted.”

Thus begins this riveting story of a woman’s quest to understand her recently deceased mother, a glamorous, cruel narcissist who left her only child, Elsie, an inheritance of debts and mysteries. While coping with threats that she suspects are coming from the cult-like spiritual program her mother belonged to, Elsie works to unravel the message her dying mother left for her, a quest that ultimately takes her to the South African family homestead she never knew existed.

I don’t know where to start on my review for this book. The author’s writing style captured me from the very start of the novel. This is a well written book that includes a wondrously structured plot of suspense. I couldn’t help but feel for Elsie as she opened up revealing various pains that all seem to have generated from the soiled relationship with her mother. Elsie has made the best of her life, but with the recent death of her mother, Rachel, old wounds start to open up and Elsie is challenged to face not only her demons but also her mother’s.

Elsie is a strong young lady who, even though she lacked her mother’s love and approval, still seemed to get through life. No, she wasn’t perfect and she had her faults but I guess that’s what made her so easy to connect with. She was a teen performance dancer, she dealt with being anorexic, she loses her best friend but gains the lead dance role. Any mother would be proud to have a daughter with such a successful early career. That’s one thing, even after finishing the novel I still didn’t understand why Elsie’s mother treated her like she did. She was her mother’s only child and yet in a way Elsie was motherless. Elsie’s self-pity is so strong that she’d rather be alone in the world; pushing away the one man that loves her beyond measure.

Elsie’s ex-husband Ted is her stronghold and voice of reason. I enjoyed reading their story. I was sad to read that Elsie’s willingness to give up and free Ted, but I was glad and found it touching that Ted’s love continued during the bad. I was glad Ted is true and consistent in Elsie’s life and that even though they are divorced he still took time to answer her calls and to help her when he could.

I enjoyed the writing style and the voice of Elsie as she looked for answers in finding herself and along the way making sense to find answers to her life. Her mother’s death didn’t necessarily mean an end, but it seemed to give Elsie strength and purpose. As I mentioned earlier, I still didn’t understand Elsie’s mother’s reasons for her actions and way of mothering. The many years that her mom had ties with the Seekers was strange to me. This part of the story is different and I tried thinking of some other reason that could put a wedge between a mother and a daughter; I guess Rachel’s deep involvement with the Seekers is good enough reason for a wedge. Reading about a cult-like religion is something new to me and it worked for this story.

I highly recommend this story for readers who enjoy going deep into a character’s emotional life where their story remains long after the you’ve turned the last page.

Pretty Masks by C. A. Bell


Pretty Masks – A Twisted Tale of Revenge by C. A. Bell
Publisher: Self-published
Genre: Contemporary, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Short Story (120 pgs)
Rating: 3 stars
Reviewed by Ginger

Masking a problem doesn’t fix it. No matter how long you keep it covered.

We all hide behind masks. Whether that be a forced smile to a loved one after a long day. A sympathetic frown of concern to someone that doesn’t really matter to you. Or a professional face at work after an almighty row at home. The fact is, we all do it. We do it because we want to be prettier on the outside than we truly are on the inside. We do it to hide the cracks that have formed due to life. But what about the people who are forced to wear masks? The people who are forced to hide their true colours because society says so?

Life has thrown its fair share of crap at Lois Johnston, and the one thing that has kept her sane and going for the last seven years is her husband, Nathan. But what happens when the one person that is keeping you safe from yourself leaves, taking not only your heart, but your sanity with them as well?

For the first time in a long time Lois is about to remove the mask that was forced upon her years ago. But what’s matured underneath after years of heartache and hiding is something even uglier than before. Life has twisted her into a monster, and she’s about to set it free.

The book started off okay. Lois Johnston is waiting for her husband Nathan to come home, she had plans to greet him with a romantic dinner that she has made. Coming home late for the last four month, Nathan placates Lois by telling her that they will take a romantic trip soon. Lois doesn’t come across as a strong woman to me. Her husband basically showed her by his actions that she wasn’t a priority, that their marriage wasn’t a priority. It is sad that she is in a marriage where she is unseen and neglected. I didn’t like that the author didn’t give Lois a life. There wasn’t any mention of any close friends. I didn’t see Lois as a fully developed character for these reasons and that her story focused more on her tragedy and disorder and not on her as a woman.

The story does alternate from Lois’s past and present. Her past gives a glimpse of how she got to where she is in the present. The glimpses of her past do help to show how her disorder developed.

I understand the Dissociative Identity Disorder to a small degree and it was disclosed that she dealt with traumatic abuse, but I didn’t understand how if Lois has been doing fine with her disorder but all of a sudden she loses control of herself and starts her journey into a world of revenge and madness. I am not familiar with what brings about DID triggers nor did I expect the dark tale of sex and murder that personality X brought to the story. I am not sure how I feel about X standing up for Lois. I want Lois to be strong and take control of her fears and life, but not by a means of violence. I wanted her husband Nathan to reap what he sowed for hurting and neglecting Lois. I guess X made him pay by her standards of punishment and I couldn’t expect a happy or satisfying ending for someone dealing with impulsive behavior.

This is a short story that is sure to keep your attention as it takes you on a ride on the many faces of Lois. This is a good, quick read that delivers the dark side of Dissociative Identity Disorder and what could possibility be the devastating results.