The Siren House by Andrew Post


The Siren House by Andrew Post
Publisher: Medallion Press
Genre: Contemporary, Sci-Fi/Fantasy
Length: Full Length (460 pgs)
Rating: Best Book
Reviewed by Stargazer

Once upon a time, the world ended. Or maybe not. Cassetera Robuck, survivor of the apocalypse, must find a way to stop the Regolatore: a theocratic time-shifting cult bent on ridding hers, and every other parallel universe, from scratchers, those who use molecular reconstruction machines to “jazz” new, impossible life. Too bad her new friend Thadius Thumb, proprietor of the holo-vaudevillian theater the Siren House, happens to be the most famous—or is it infamous?—scratcher of them all.

As a kid, life for Cassetera Robuck was hard enough suffering from a nerve disorder that prevented use of her legs. Then, the apocalypse happened. To survive, Cassetera and her family made a new home on an abandoned oil rig on Lake Superior. There, she and her father discover a machine. One that can take things apart molecule-by-molecule and reassemble them. Ten years later and when her family is all but lost, Cassetera heads into an apocalypse-torn Duluth to seek out a man calling himself the Fabulous Thadius Thumb, the proprietor of a holo-cast variety show staged nightly at the Siren House. Thadius is not only a ringleader to the Thickskulled Thespians and their head writer, he is also a resistance leader. Against what? Those who caused the apocalypse, of course. The Regolatore, a universe-hopping terror cult that use machines all too similar to the one Cassetera and her dad found . . .

“You have to read this book!” A phrase I uttered even before finishing the book itself.

The Siren House is not what you might expect, it is a look at what could be, what was and what should be-all at the same time. Yet, the flow of the story is not nearly as confusing as it may sound. The whole premise of the story rests on the realization that there are multiple timelines, multiple variations of existence and multiple variations of ourselves across the infinite fields of time and space.

But, the plot does not get bogged down in the ridiculous complexity of the variables of time and space. In fact, the plot itself is told from the eyes and experiences of Cassetera Robuck. Well, one of the Cassetera Robucks, in one of the dimensions where the Regolatore have set up shop to keep the people of her dimension from advancing their technology and knowledge so much that they are a threat to other worlds and ultimately other dimensions in search of raw materials to create further enhanced technologies.

The story flows so well-from the deep descriptions to thorough and engrossing conversations that keep the reader directly involved with the story, so much that I had a hard time putting the book down because I felt almost as though I had left a part of myself in the story. Although I could not put the book down, I struggled because each page I completed reading would be one page closer to the end of the story. The story, with alternate dimensions, other realities and other timelines actually flowed together and did not become confusing. In fact, the author does an amazing job at creating such explanations that the reader will most likely come to wonder if this is truly a possibility to happen today.

The many different characters, from the workers at The Siren House to Cassetera and Thadius, histories and backstories were complete, full and made each character feel fully formed. The flow of conversations, the main plot and sub plots all flowed together. The entire story moved on its own time without being rushed or feeling like it was dragging. Overall, this was a fantastic and excellent jump at the reality that there are many more realities in an ever-present universe. Then, when the end did come, there was not the pain of separation-as the author did an amazing job of sorting out the details and not leaving the reader wanting more. The best part? It wasn’t set up for a series of sequels like so many stories are, although there are ways to make a spin off- this story is not set up as a pipe to any other story. Simply, this was just one amazing read.

Just like the beginning of the story where the chapter title is “The beginning is the end is the beginning” I reiterate, “You have to read this book!”

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