Frost & Claus by Matilda Janes


Frost & Claus by Matilda Janes
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Paranormal, Holiday, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (49 pages)
Other: M/F
Rating: 3 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

She loves to frost cookies. Now he’s going to frost hers.

Santa’s eldest daughter Chrystal Claus is curvy, cute, and loves to bake. Opening her bakery has been a dream come true, she loves to watch her customers smile after they’ve eaten one of her treats. It’s her gift and she’s never been happier. That is until Jack Frost comes back into town, seemingly intent on disrupting her life with his scowling eyes, grumpy growls, and all his bulging muscles, she can’t help but notice! After he embarrasses and hurts her feelings she decides she can’t stand the handsome jerk. But when she’s kidnapped, Chrystal discovers not all is as it seems.

Jack Frost has been waiting for Chrystal Claus for an eternity, and when she comes of age Jack wants to claim his mate. But it isn’t to be; bound by a promise, Jack reluctantly leaves Christmas Town. When he returns years later he can barely contain himself. He wants nothing more than to claim his mate and no one will stand in his way. Or so he thinks.

Can Chrystal accept being Mrs. Frost? Will Jack convince Chrystal that being naughty can be nice?

Chrystal and her sisters have all been good this year. Only time will tell how they’re rewarded for that.

Ms. Janes had a descriptive and playful writing style that worked well for her subject matter. From the opening scene in Chrystal’s bakery to the steamy experiences she shared with Jack in private later on, I was always able to easily picture what was going on. The author did a good job at showing the audience what was happening in her story at every step along the way.

I would have liked to see way more time spent developing the chemistry between the Claus sisters and the men who wanted to be with them. This was something I noticed especially between Jack Frost and Chrystal Claus. He had a strong desire for her from the very first scene, but at the same time he barely knew anything about her at all. Due to this, the chemistry between them never felt right to me.

The dialogue often made me smile. I liked discovering how many Christmas and folklore references the characters made throughout the plot. Not only did the mixture of all of these references give the storyline a creative spin, it made Christmas town come alive in my imagination. It felt like a real place to me, and that’s not something that’s easy to accomplish in a story of this length.

Frost & Claus should be read by anyone who is in the mood for a sultry version of life at the North Pole.

Witches: Tea Party by Mark Taylor


Witches: Tea Party by Mark Taylor
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Paranormal, Historical, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (46 pages)
Rating: 3 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

In Salem, 1692, Marie-Anne witnessed the death of her friend and confidant, Sarah Good. Charged with being a witch, Sarah goes to the gallows to protect Marie-Anne, a true witch.

Three hundred years later, Marie-Anne, under the name Mary Anson, vows to put things right.

With a new coven – Dina, Excalibur, and Lady – Mary puts in motion the steps to right what went wrong…and what followers is a chase across the country, a chase against time, pursued by monsters and darkness…

…will Mary put things right?

…or will she die trying?

It’s never too late to try to fix a past mistake.

Mary’s personality was quite well developed. She was an intelligent, cunning, and stubborn woman who definitely had her fair share of flaws. There were times when she made decisions that made me shake my head, but there was always something about her that kept me coming back for more. Her personality was so complex that she felt like a real person to me. That’s not an easy thing to accomplish in a short story, so Mr. Taylor should be commended for pulling it off.

Unfortunately, there were many loose plot ends left dangling after the final scene. While I understand that this is the first story in a series and that the author wanted to leave room to explore the conflicts again in the future, it was unsatisfactory for me as a reader to finish the last paragraph without feeling a sense of closure about the majority of the issues that Mary faced during the course of this tale. It would have been nice to see her accomplish more of her goals before she tried to move onto her next adventure.

The world building was handled beautifully, though. The narrator quickly introduced the complicated and sometimes dangerous society that witches had developed and then left it up to the audience to fill in the blanks as the plot moved forward. There was a lot of ground to cover in order to fully develop the settings and that culture. I was always comfortable with how much I was learning about Mary’s world, though, and I walked away from it feeling as if I’d really been there with her.

Witches: Tea Party should be read by anyone who would like to lose themselves in another time and place.

Year One by Nora Roberts


Year One by Nora Roberts
Publisher: St. Martin’s Press
Genre: Contemporary, Paranormal
Length: Full Length (419 pgs)
Heat Level: Sensual
Rated: 4 stars
Reviewed by Poppy

It began on New Year’s Eve.

The sickness came on suddenly, and spread quickly. The fear spread even faster. Within weeks, everything people counted on began to fail them. The electrical grid sputtered; law and government collapsed―and more than half of the world’s population was decimated.

Where there had been order, there was now chaos. And as the power of science and technology receded, magick rose up in its place. Some of it is good, like the witchcraft worked by Lana Bingham, practicing in the loft apartment she shares with her lover, Max. Some of it is unimaginably evil, and it can lurk anywhere, around a corner, in fetid tunnels beneath the river―or in the ones you know and love the most.

As word spreads that neither the immune nor the gifted are safe from the authorities who patrol the ravaged streets, and with nothing left to count on but each other, Lana and Max make their way out of a wrecked New York City. At the same time, other travelers are heading west too, into a new frontier. Chuck, a tech genius trying to hack his way through a world gone offline. Arlys, a journalist who has lost her audience but uses pen and paper to record the truth. Fred, her young colleague, possessed of burgeoning abilities and an optimism that seems out of place in this bleak landscape. And Rachel and Jonah, a resourceful doctor and a paramedic who fend off despair with their determination to keep a young mother and three infants in their care alive.

In a world of survivors where every stranger encountered could be either a savage or a savior, none of them knows exactly where they are heading, or why. But a purpose awaits them that will shape their lives and the lives of all those who remain.

The end has come. The beginning comes next.

Get ready to read something unlike anything you’ve read by Nora Roberts before. I hadn’t even read the blurb before I picked up a copy of Year One and so had no preconceived notions of what I should expect. I’m really glad of that, though I will say that this book starts a trilogy that’s completely different from her previous works. It’s not romance, not really, though there are obviously relationships in the story and it’s not her typical annual trilogy following sets of people (either three or four women and men) who have some goal to reach and end up falling in love on the way.

Now that I’ve said what this book isn’t, let me tell you what it is. It’s fairly dark and depressing, and after the initial near-extinction of the human race, a battle of good and evil begins that is exceptionally reminiscent of The Stand by Stephen King. The book starts by showing us the unleashing of evil, in the form of a plague that kills more than 5 billion people. Additionally, many of the immune develop unexpected powers (they become witches or fairies or shape-shifters or other paranormal beings). There are good and bad in both the “uncanny” and those without new powers. Just like anything else, how things are used depends on the character of those who use them.

The story follows a few groups of people who ultimately merge together. We have Max and Lana, two lovers who were already somewhat aware of their powers prior to Doom (the name given to the plague), but became exponentially more powerful after. Then there is Arlys, a TV reporter who does her best to honestly and factually report about the demise of humanity and the world as we know it. Next is Jonah and Rachel, an EMT and a doctor. Each begins the trek out of the city (New York) on their own, and each set of folks pick up others on their journey.

This is not an uplifting romance, or a tale with much that is light. There are pockets of happiness, but they are few and far between. The world is ending. Violence is on the rise. The uncanny are being hunted, tortured and murdered. Evil is growing. Despite the fact that dark stories are not usually my preferred reading, I had a hard time putting this book down. I was completely invested in the characters, especially Eddie and Jonah who really grabbed me by the heartstrings. I needed to see what happened to everyone–but be prepared, just as in real life, not everyone is going to make it to the end.

There is also “the one”… the person who will apparently be the one who can save the world. I honestly found this a tad corny and struggled with the idea, but am reserving judgment until the next book which I imagine will give me a chance to be a bit more accepting. I also didn’t like the character arc Ms. Roberts gave Lana. I want to avoid spoilers, but I found her behavior at the end (a change of heart, you might say) to be a bit difficult to believe.

I’ve heard from others that they didn’t even bother to read past the first few chapters because this isn’t a typical Nora Roberts book. While I wish they’d have given the book a little more of a chance, they’re right. I recommend you pick up this book not expecting that. Instead, just be prepared to be engaged. Don’t force your own preconceived notions about what the book should be, enjoy it for what it is. I certainly did and can’t wait to read the next in the series. I, for one, am glad to see Ms. Roberts spreading her wings a bit and endeavoring to not just churn out something usual or clichéd. Despite the darkness here, she still engaged me and did the one thing I think she does best: created characters that mattered to me. Ultimately, that’s why I read books and it’s one of her strongest abilities.

Grab a copy. Read it. Then let me know what you thought.

Vessel of Power by Michelle O’Leary


Vessel of Power by Michelle O’Leary
Publisher: The Wild Rose Press
Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy
Length: Full Length (389 pgs)
Heat Level: Spicy
Rating: 4 stars
Reviewed by Poinsettia

Lia must stop the elemental prince at all costs. Prince Destin is searching for the Vessel of Power, an object containing the might of the gods. His soulless father will use it to destroy their world, starting with her family. Lia will do whatever it takes to protect the Vessel, except she can’t seem to end this magnetic prince of fire. Destin won’t let anything stand in his way, even a gorgeous changeling with mayhem on her mind. He’s determined to prove his worth as son and heir by retrieving the Vessel for his father. Lia challenges him at every turn, but he burns whenever he’s near this tantalizing changeling. Torn between loyalty to family and desire for one another, Destin and Lia struggle to find the right path. Can they save their world and each other? Will finding the Vessel bind them together or drive them apart forever?

Lia has a very good reason to keep the Vessel of Power hidden.

Lia was prepared to do anything to stop Destin from finding the Vessel of Power, but one glance at the elemental prince gave her pause. Instead of a ruthless, power hungry royal, Destin is much more human than Lia ever could have imagined. Despite their vastly different backgrounds, Lia and Destin aren’t as different as they seem. If only they’d stop fighting long enough to realize it.

Lis and Destin have an antagonistic relationship right from the start as they have opposing views on the Vessel. Lia professes to want the Vessel to stay hidden to save the world from destruction, but Destin and his cousin, Rune, believe Lia has a much more personal reason for wanting the Vessel to remain hidden. It is very interesting to watch Destin, Lia, and Rune interact. Lia alternates between helping Destin escape the clutches of his uncle and putting her own stumbling blocks in Destin’s path. Even though they are on opposite sides where the Vessel is concerned, it is clear that Lia and Destin have great chemistry, and I couldn’t help but wonder how long it would take them to realize they’d be stronger together than apart. I do think that their relationship was rushed. It just seemed like one minute they were fighting and annoying each other and the next they were in love. I would have liked to see more of a transition between those extremes.

Rune is by far my favorite character. I liked him immediately, and he is consistently a bright spot in this tale. Rune is so much fun, and he always lightens the mood at just the right time. I found myself smiling every time he opened his mouth. Even Lia, who doesn’t open to others easily, can’t help but like him.

I’m glad I had the opportunity to read Vessel of Power. I hope that Ms. O’Leary has plans for a sequel because I’d love to spend more time with Rune, Lia, and Destin. Fans of fantasy romance won’t want to miss this novel.

Lunacy’s Core by T.D. Edwards


Lunacy’s Core by T.D. Edwards
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Paranormal, Sci-Fi/Fantasy
Length: Short Story (125 pages)
Rating: 4 stars
Reviewed by Peony

It’s the late 1990s and Kory Diffoten is a bookworm with no friends apart from his English literature teacher, which is fine with him. Growing up the target of relentless teasing about his unstable aunt has made him reluctant to get close with others in the first place. However, once a freak accident renders his favorite teacher incapable of returning to Hushmore High School, Kory finds himself swept into an unexpected friendship with Ronda Smith, a pretty classmate in need of tutoring, and Jakil Dunston, her flippant boyfriend. The unlikely friendship soon takes an unexpected turn though, spawning troublesome rumors, complicated feelings, and ultimately, a police investigation.

Then there’s Kory’s increasing paranoia. He’s certain his recent affiliation with Ronda and Jakil has caught the attention of an eerie and potentially dangerous new teacher at their school for some reason. But getting anyone to take him seriously seems impossible, especially once people began to question his sanity. Kory can’t really blame them though, particularly upon noticing his sudden difficulty with separating truth from illusion.

Yet, Kory can only keep quiet for so long before things spiral out of control. But who’s going to believe him when he sometimes isn’t sure he can even believe himself?

T.D. Edwards delivers a refreshing story, one that destroys old tropes with her paranormal mystery, Lunacy’s Core. Though the descriptions of a book are meant to be the first hook for a reader, so many have fallen into the same generic trends that when books like this one do something different, it is instantly noteworthy. With Lunacy’s Core we have a refreshing friendship dynamic offered and the author absolutely does not fail to deliver.

Although this is a rather short book, there is a lot to love with how dynamic and impactful the characters manage to be. As a reader it takes no effort to put yourself in the shoes of our lead, Kory, whom will feel familiar to anyone who has ever struggled to fit in. While he is a compelling character all by himself, the true genius comes from Edward’s use of supporting characters. The summary promises colorful friends with Ronda and Jakil, but it is a mystery as to what role they will play. You could divide this book between the slice of life, an all too familiar high school drama, and the magical realism and still have two excellent stories. The main characters really are fantastically told and ultimately end up being the glue that holds the whole experience together.

Another draw that this book promises is a mystery with reality questioning implications. Like much of the book, the greater mystery is a slow burn, foreshadowed and hinted at initially and then later more fully expounded on. There are certainly interesting plot points to be had that will keep a reader going. For me the effort put into giving the villains motivations and obstacles of their own to overcome helped drive the narrative, but you need not take my word for it. Reading the book will show you exactly what I mean and given the length, it should not be hard to get from one hook to the next and experience the tale as the author intended.

This isn’t to say the book is entirely without flaws. For instance, our supporting main characters are supposed to be popular foils to our outcast Kory. While this is paid some lip service early on, the author does not really show this and instead you’re left wondering who, if anyone, is their friends. The story instead paints a slightly different picture of an odd ball bunch, rather than the popular kids and their genuine friendship. Another thing to be aware of is that this book is short. While length should not dissuade a reader, the fact remains the ending will come abruptly and may leave some unsatisfying loose ends. If this bugs you, fret not, there is a sequel already available and considering the accessibility of both volumes, the length becomes entirely forgivable.

If you’re looking for a refreshing take on teen friendship with a hefty dose of mystery and reality questioning paranormal, then you might find a good home here. T.D Edwards certainly demonstrates a lot of talent in writing with her first published work and I will look forward to her future ventures. Though it may not be a masterpiece, the time needed to enjoy this with an instantly compelling narrative shouldn’t in any way prevent a prospective reader from picking it up. After all, what have you got to lose? Maybe just your sanity.

The Path: Keeper of Amaarand by E.H. James


The Path: Keeper of Amaarand by E.H. James
The Demon Series Part 8

Publisher: Crushing Hearts and Black Butterfly Publishing
Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Horror, Paranormal, Historical, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (54 pages)
Rating: 3.5 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

When Max Jensen is brutally murdered, on September 9, 1962, Timmy Jensen’s life is changed forever.

Timmy adored Max, and his loss was something neither he, nor his parents, could overcome. Shunned and ostracized, as the brother of that murdered teen, Timmy manages to find a job with a kind man by the name of Earl Jackman. Hauling away junk from people’s attics, Timmy meets Jenny Krieger and falls in love. Only Jenny’s father won’t have it, and she is shipped off to boarding school in Europe. But not before he meets Jenny’s grandma and is given a powerful medallion, known as the Amaarand.

Told he can use it to rescue his brother Max’s soul from hell, he must now patiently wait for his opportunity. He just didn’t know he’d have to wait until 2012.

Sometimes the best way to handle a supernatural battle is to wait for the perfect time to strike.

The dialogue was well done. There were a few scenes where characters were able to guess what their conversation partner was about to say and respond to it before the other person had even had a chance to speak. This was a creative way to keep those scene moving, and I enjoyed seeing how easy it was for them to make those educated guesses.

There were some pacing issues in the beginning. It took a while for the narrator to explain what Timmy’s life was like during the years after his brother was murdered. Timmy wasn’t a character I was necessarily expecting to see again, so it was interesting to see how he was brought back into the plot for the grand finale. It was a pleasant surprise, though, and I was glad to see him get more time to show the audience what he was about.

I was quite pleased with how the author wrapped everything up. The previous instalments spent a lot of time creating a complex world that involved everything from time travel to alternate timelines to the notorious behavior of demons who were capable of twisting any human action to their own dark purposes. There was a lot of material to cover because of this, and I was happy with how well it was all tied together by the end of the last scene.

This is part of a series. It should be read in order.

The Path: Keeper of Amaarand should be read by any horror or science fiction fans who enjoyed the first seven parts of this tale.

The Immortals and Other Tales by Victor J. Banis


The Immortals and Other Tales by Victor J. Banis
Publisher: Untreed Reads
Genre: Suspense/Mystery, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Horror, Historical, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (90 pages)
Heat Level: Spicy
Rating: 4 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

Edgy. Controversial. Thoughtful. Brilliant.

There are a lot of adjectives that have been used over the decades to describe the writings of Victor J. Banis. From his start in gay fiction, to forays into other genres such as mystery and horror, Banis’ unique voice has brought to life a myriad of characters and creatures, excitement and entertainment, as well as the trials and tribulations of love between both gay and straight couples. Gathered here are stories spanning more than five decades of Banis’ incredible career, including “Broken Record,” his first story to ever be published.

No matter how strong they may be, first impressions aren’t always correct.

In “New Kid in Town,” the main character had slowly come to regret her marriage to a kind, wealthy man who was much older than she was. She spoke of her spouse in such glowing terms that I was surprised by how tired she seemed to be of their relationship. The more I read, the more curious I became about what could be making her so unhappy. It was as much fun to discover the twist ending to this one as it was to try to figure out what was going on in advance.

While I deeply enjoyed the majority of the tales in this collection, there were a couple that I thought could use more development. “The Journey (a parable)” was one of them. There was one character, and he or she was never given a name, backstory, or any identifying features. I was intrigued by the idea of a narrator speaking directly to the audience about what they think human intellect can and can’t do for people who are on a literal or metaphorical journey, but I would have liked to see more time spent transforming this monologue into something that also included a traditional sort of plot at some point.

The protagonist in “The Canals of Mars” was a man whose face had been badly scarred in a lab accident. After his boyfriend left him, he had the chance to find love again with an old friend. As their love began to blossom, they both began to experience things that defied explanation. What I enjoyed the most about this tale was how many different ways it could be interpreted. Mr. Banis is quite good at tying multiple genres together in ways that I don’t typically see them combined, and this was one of the best examples of that talent of his that I’ve seen so far.

I’d recommend The Immortals and Other Tales to anyone who is looking for some truly creative mysteries.

Of Noble Blood: Out of the Darkness by E.H. James


Of Noble Blood: Out of the Darkness, The Demon Series Part 7 by E.H. James
Publisher: Crushing Hearts and Black Butterfly Publishing
Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Horror, Paranormal, Historical, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (53 pages)
Heat Level: Sweet
Rating: 4 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

Being the queen’s daughter doesn’t exclude you, when the fate of the world is in the balance. And when Princess Amara has the opportunity to help, she readily accepts.

Transformed into a shape-shifting time traveler, she journeys back through the centuries to the year 1522. Here she retrieves a baby boy and brings him forward to the year 1995, where he becomes Jesse Miller.

Unaware he is chosen, he comes to realize he alone must save the world. And with the help of Amara, he must travel further yet into the future, to destroy the demon infiltration and repair the damaged timeline.

But the story is far from over, and when he returns to 2233, where he lives with Amara, he discovers there is far more to experience than he can possibly imagine.

Imagine what it would be like to remember doing something that technically hasn’t happened in your timeline yet.

The time travel in this story was incredibly complex. Multiple timelines interfered with each other over and over again, so I was glad that the author spent as much time as possible showing the audience what happened in each timeline before and after they were changed yet again. This made for a pleasant reading experience, especially once the pacing picked up and Amara’s mission became even more urgent

There were so many other conflicts going on that I was a little bit surprised when a romantic twist was included as well. While I liked both of the characters who were involved in it and it is a minor criticism, the plot would have been even stronger if it had stuck to the main storyline. The characters had plenty to keep them busy as it was.

As usual, the world building was spectacular. I know I’ve mentioned this in previous reviews of this series, but I love the way all of these stories build on each other over time. There are little details in each one of them that are later expanded on. This makes it important to read everything in order, and it also makes it rewarding for longterm readers who may have wondered about a small detail early on that is only now being fully explored.

I’d recommend Of Noble Blood: Out of the Darkness, The Demon Series Part 7 to all of the fans of this world. It was one of the best instalments in it so far!

S.A.R.A.H. by P.C. Ryan


S.A.R.A.H. by P.C. Ryan
Publisher: Deep Desires Press
Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy
Length: Short Story (24 pages)
Other: M/F, M/F/F, Anal Play, Menage
Rating: 3 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

Robert Vincent is a thirty-eight year old loner who is awkward with women. In fact, he’s never been laid. But the year is 2040 and automaton technology is reaching a new height.

Desperate, Robert orders the latest model, a companion named S.A.R.A.H. (Sexually Active Robot Artificial Human). He expects at least an exciting substitute, an escape from the endless chain of disappointments in his real life.

What he finds instead, when he opens the crate, is far more than he could ever have imagined.

Could you fall in love with a robot if you knew they were a machine from the beginning?

I liked the fact that Robert’s motivation for wanting to buy a robot were so clearly explained in the opening scene. The loneliness he felt was a serious problem, and he’d clearly spent a lot of time trying to fix that issue in any way he could. I was curious to see if Sarah would give him the companionship he desired so much.

There were many character development issues. It was especially noticeable with the two female characters. While I understood why Sarah would be programmed to agree with everything her owner wanted to do, I found it odd that the other female character behaved the same way since she was human. It would have been helpful to understand what their motivations were and what they actually wanted out of life. I never understood who they were as individuals, and that made it hard for me to empathize with them.

The science fiction elements of the book were fascinating. Early on, the main character explained that robots were so advanced in the 2040s that they could do anything a human being could do other than give birth. I was fascinated by the idea of a machine who looked and behaved exactly like the average person, and I couldn’t wait to find out more.

Robert didn’t face any conflict in this story. I was expecting him to meet resistance at some point during his adventures in order for him to have something to encourage him to be persistent. The fact that it didn’t happen made it harder for me to stay interested in what was happening to him because he seemed to get what he wanted immediately without ever having to negotiate or struggle for it.

One of the other things I appreciated about the main character was how interested he was in giving pleasure to Sarah as well as receiving it from her. Despite the issues with her character development, Robert was clearly determined to make sure she had a good time with him no matter what they were doing.

S.A.R.A.H. should be read by anyone who has ever dreamed about what it would be like to have all of their wishes come true.

Security (Spaceport 1) by Shelby Morgen


Security (Spaceport 1) by Shelby Morgen
Publisher: Changeling Press
Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Suspense/Mystery, Paranormal
Length: Short Story (38 pages)
Other: M/F
Rating: 3 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

A dark corner of a seedy bar on the edge of nowhere. A woman who’s seen too much. A man who moves through the shadows with the grace of a cat.

She’s on his tail, and he’s determined to find out why. Once he might have been flattered to have her checking out his ass. Now he knows women are dangerous. And far, far too expensive.

But Commander Kala Decoltéir always gets her man, and she wants the space pirate they call Dancer — no matter who — or what — he is. This time, Dancer has no escape.

All Kala was looking for was one night of pleasure to help her unwind from her stressful life. Only time would tell if that’s what she’d receive or how she’d feel the next morning.

The world building was well done. I especially liked reading about the slang terms Ms. Morgen had developed for this universe. The fact that she expected the audience to pay attention and figure out the definitions of them for ourselves only made me more curious to figure them out. They also fleshed out this character’s world in all kinds of subtle but worthwhile ways.

I had trouble keeping track of all of the characters. It was confusing to read about them because there were more of them than I’d normally expect to find in a short story and because most of them weren’t described with a lot of detail. This was something that was most noticeable when it came to Kala talking about the people she knew through her job.

Kala and Dancer had great chemistry. I totally understood why things moved so quickly between them because of how intense their attraction was towards each other. They were clearly a great match inside of the bedroom, and that made me wonder if they’d be good for each other outside of the bedroom in the longterm as well. This was a question I had to know the answer to, so I didn’t stop reading until I’d figured out what would happen to them next.

I’d recommend Security (Spaceport 1) to anyone who is in the mood for something short and steamy.