Shrouded Memory by Krista Wagner


Shrouded Memory by Krista Wagner
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Mystery/Suspense, Contemporary
Length: Full Length (249 pages)
Rating: 3 Stars
Reviewed by Snowdrop

What You Don’t Remember Can Hurt You

After surviving a shark attack, Marine Biologist Rian Field becomes haunted by disturbing memories of a past traumatic incident and begins to suspect that the assailants may be those closest to her. But more chilling is her fear that they are somehow connected to the shark attack and want her dead. Rian must overcome her fear of sharks and uncover the truth before the past drags her into its shadows.

Can a large whale be dangerous in an estuary?

Estuaries are places where the salt water meets the fresh water. A place that holds all sorts of weird species. Why would Rian Field get her PhD in Marine Estuarine & Aquatic Life Studies in a place like this? She was even a little afraid of water. For that matter, why would she want to see and study the Great White shark? But…many of us have seen the movie Jaws and thoughts of such a movie have stayed with us for years. Rian Field had been fascinated with sharks ever since she saw the movie.

Just like I seem to know Rian and her thoughts, the author also did a good job with development of many of the characters. While I enjoyed reading this book, it does have a lot of flashbacks in the form of dreams, “bad guy thoughts” and memories. Sometimes that can be hard to follow or throw off the flow of reading. It was handled pretty well by this author. One thing that helped ease the flow of reading was that dreams, thoughts of the “bad guy” and regular prose were all done in different fonts. This made Shrouded Memory much easier to read than many books of its type.

This is a book full of relationships, good friends, and intrigue. I read it very quickly but not because it was easy. It was because I didn’t want to put it down.

The Time by Peri Elizabeth Scott


The Time by Peri Elizabeth Scott
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Horror, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (75 pages)
Rating: 3 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

In a post apocalyptic world, a woman struggles to survive until reunited with her son, only to bring grave danger to the small band of people he leads. Choosing to sacrifice herself to protect the clan, Ann Murdoch discovers how resourceful she can be in the face of torture and death.

She knew revenge was a luxury even as she yearned for it, her daughter horribly murdered. And Ann has killed a boy, albeit in self defense, and obviously someone connected to him didn’t view luxury in the same way. And that someone is well past the yearning stage…

How long would you survive in a society that no longer had a government and was quickly running out of food?

Malnutrition makes everything in life more difficult, from defending one’s home to finding the energy to keep walking in order to find a safe place to sleep at night. Some of my favorite sections of this tale were the ones that described how the main character and her companions survived in a world where most people were running out of food and where strangers would kill anyone for a few supplies. Yes, they were dark scenes at times, but the characters were so determined to survive that I couldn’t wait to see what they’d eat next and how they’d avoid starvation over the winter.

This tale would have benefitted from more editing. There were a few sentences that didn’t make sense to me because they were either missing words or contained words that didn’t fit into the their tone. Many other sentences had comma or other punctuation errors that made them hard to follow at times. While I deeply enjoyed the plot itself, needing to decipher what the narrator was trying to say so often was frustrating for me as a reader.

It was easy to keep track of all of the characters even though there were far more of them than I’d normaly expect to meet in a short story. Everyone the author wrote about had something unique about them that instantly let me know who she was talking about. This was a good decision, especially later on in the storyline when many of them were involved in the same scenes and there were a lot of different things happening at once.

If you’re a fan of post-apocalyptic fiction, give The Time a try.

The Tell All by Libby Howard


The Tell All by Libby Howard
Publisher: Self-published
Genre: Suspense/Mystery, Paranormal, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (137 pages)
Rating: 3 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

Life at sixty isn’t quite what Kay Carrera expected. She’s working as a skip-tracer for a PI who is desperate to land his own reality TV show. She has a new roommate who arrived with more than the usual amount of baggage. And her attempts at knitting are less than stellar – way less than stellar. Worse, the cataract surgery that restored her sight has also delivered an unexpected and disturbing side-effect. Kay sees ghosts. And when the dead turn to her for help, she just can’t say no.

It’s hard to have a peaceful life when the dead keep trying to get your attention.

Kay was a well-developed and quite likeable main character. Her intelligence was what caught my eye first. She wasn’t the kind of person who would ever make a big fuss over something like this, but I enjoyed seeing her quietly figure out how to get through sticky situations and solve mysteries that didn’t give her a lot of clues to work with at first. Her flaws were written nicely as well. They showed me sides of her personality that I wouldn’t have otherwise seen. Noticing them only made me like her more than I already did because of how much they humanized a woman who was so sweet, gentle, and interested in making her home an oasis for everyone who lived there.

The pacing issues were what prompted me to choose the rating I did. As much as I enjoyed getting to know the characters, it took a while for the plot to pick up speed and even more time for Kay to realize that the shadowy figures her optometrist thought were a side effect of cataract surgery were actually real spirits. It would have been nice to have more time to explore what was happening and to have more clues about the case earlier on.

Once the mystery was revealed, though, I dove straight into it. There was far more going on than Kay originally thought, so I was curious to see how she’d react to all of the new information she found as she probed more deeply into the case. It didn’t take long for her to follow the clues she was given. I was intrigued by how persistent she was and how she reacted to certain surprising plot twists.

The Tell All was a cozy story that I’d recommend to anyone who is in the mood for a fairly quick read.

Suzy Spitfire Kills Everybody by Joe Canzano


Suzy Spitfire Kills Everybody by Joe Canzano
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Action/Adventure, Sci-Fi/Fantasy
Length: Full Length (306 pages)
Rating: 3 stars
Reviewed by Peony

When outlaw Suzy Spitfire discovers her father was murdered after creating a super-duper artificial intelligence, she races across the solar system in search of the brain he built—but it’s a rough ride, and she’s soon forced to tangle with pirates, predators, and her father’s killer—as well as a man she thinks she can love.

Suzy Spitfire Kills Everybody is a smash-bang sci-fi adventure filled with action, intrigue, and a dose of dark humor.

Joe Canzano’s fast paced action Suzy Spitfire Kills Everybody begins with a bang and never slows down. The author himself has a few books under his belt, but perhaps none quite so eye catching as this, with the very first hook delivered by a title that you can’t help but give a second glance to. As of this writing, Joe has already written five books and his talent with action adventure shows through the page with pulse pounding excitement. It is hard not to pick up a book with such a bodacious title, but once you do it may be harder still to put it down.

What kind of wild ride is this book? The initial hook hints at either an action or a comedy, or a mixture of both. Without spoiling the excitement, I can say with certainty it is an action. While there are a few running gags to be had, the chuckles are clearly not the focus of this story and shouldn’t be what guides your choice. For some the jokes may fall flat entirely and really, they’re pretty sparse, making this book clearly aimed at the action crowd. Luckily the action hook doesn’t make you wait, the story opens with a bang within the first half dozen pages. For those seeking an explosive read, the book does try to deliver, though initially at least it may seem mindless. Almost for the entire book the narrative focus is on the external, the events that happen, but not the why. Internal narrative, the emotions driving the actors or the drama is almost entirely neglected. Ultimately this book most closely resembles the summer blockbuster action flick, lot of muscle, but not a long of mind.

Because the book is so heavily slanted to the goings on and not the reasons why and because it opens to a gunfight so soon, there is little to no room for development before explosions start happening. The book does start to talk about romance and hint at the possibility, before building a character whose romance would matter to you, let alone if they live or die. In order to have any sense of worry or concern for the safety or the characters you’ll have to read on for quite a while, because for the most part nothing truly developmental happens until a good third into the book. The approach seems to be very whimsical, with ideas tossed out randomly and sometimes contradicting themselves on the same page. If the book had a planned armature, or guiding principal or moral I cannot say what it was, the story really doesn’t lend well to analysis, preferring to be the roller coaster that you’re just along for the ride.

That isn’t to say the book doesn’t manage some impressive feats in terms of development and change. For instance our titular character is very rash to begin, but is forced to depend on others. Whether or not she can or will allow anyone to take control, help her out or solve a situation for her quickly becomes a running theme for the story. Other aspects that worked well is her view of sexuality. There is romance in the story, but it largely fades and leaves it to the reader’s imagination. Free loving or not is a theme that gets some attention in that the characters may be laid back about whom and when they engage romantically with people. The book simply does not judge a woman for taking control of her own sexuality, nor for being strong in her own right and features more than one example of both. LGBT is not included in this book, but nor is it spoken against and male and females are capable in this story of having meaningful friendships with both genders without being judged or painted into a box. This gives the reader the opportunity to draw their own conclusions and for some the absence may bother them. There is a lot of sexual tension to be had and virtually no one, especially female, is going to escape the possibility of a romantic storyline or two.

One of the main driving forces of this book is the action and the tense moments which tend to be the glue holding sections together. They’re constant and can seem overwrought in many ways. The biggest problems, besides the earlier mentioned lack of development, is that the story does tend to contradict itself and use questionable means to escape situations. For instance, at one point a room is described as lacking cover for the bad guys, but then a few sentences later the same room is described as having plenty of cover once Suzy needs it. Additionally the way situations are escaped can range wildly from deus ex machina to well thought-out and clever. The movie analogy really fits there, where as it isn’t hard to imagine the action movie with bad guys unable to hit anything and good guys with seemingly perfect aim.

Overall recommending this book depends more on the individual reading it than anything else. Summer blockbusters are hugely popular and this book captures a lot of that excitement within its pages. Despite the early lack of development, it actually manages to catch up as the book goes on and deliver some deeper than expected characters and interactions, all while not slowing the pace down. For the right reader this book could be an amazing fit and will surely make you wonder what else Joe’s library of work contains. He’s certainly proven that he can make exciting action and if that is something you enjoy reading then you should definitely not pass up Suzy Spitfire Kills Everybody.

Blade of Darkness by Dianne Duvall


Blade of Darkness by Dianne Duvall
Immortal Guardians
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Action/Adventure, Contemporary, Paranormal, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Full length (382 pgs)
Heat Level: Spicy
Rating: 5 stars
Reviewed by Xeranthemum

Dana Pembroke has been able to glimpse the future of those she touches for as long as she can remember. But she never saw Aidan coming. When the tall, dark Celt with the charming grin yet world-weary eyes walks through her door, the future she sees for him is one full of violence, danger, deception… and passion. Because amidst the terrifying battles that unfold in her visions, she also sees herself in Aidan’s arms and in his bed. Dana knows she should keep her distance, but the tender moments and laughter they share entice her even as she finds herself thrust into a world of vampires, immortals, and other preternatural beings.

Immortal Guardian Aidan O’Byrne has been hunting and slaying psychotic vampires for nearly three thousand years, so visions of bloody battles don’t trouble him. The battles Dana foresees, however, show Aidan’s brethren turning against him, so he can’t help but feel alarmed. While he spends as much time as he can with Dana, struggling to decipher her dire predictions, Aidan finds himself utterly smitten. Hope rises that he has finally found a woman who can banish the darkness and loneliness that plague him. But when vampires begin targeting Dana and a powerful enemy spawns chaos, will fate grant them time to find happiness together?

You know how some novels can take a week to read even though it’s really good but your progress is kind of slow because it’s heavily detailed, wordy or intricate and you have to spend time letting it gel? Well, have I got news for you. Forget that happening in Ms. Duvall’s latest Immortal Guardian adventure. Finishing the book was a compulsion that overtook even the interest to eat. Seriously, the balance of dialogue, descriptions and action, never mind the wonderful love scenes between Dana and Aidan – all of it was sheer perfection. The writing was strong and evocative, the plot suspenseful and gripping, and the characters are those a reader can fall in love with. There is nothing slow about this book. I devoured the entire story in one day!

Blade of Darkness left me breathless; every single feeling and emotion a story can evoke is brilliantly brought to life with an impact that left me clamoring for more. I don’t know how Ms. Duvall does it but she consistently delivers a high impact, thoroughly engaging story in each installment that follows a gifted one finding love with an Immortal Guardian who never thought to find true love. It’s the best hook in the world and this author does it justice.

I lost count as to how many times my heart was in my throat during the sword battles as Aidan and his brothers fought against the insane vampires. Drama and gripping suspense shot through the stratosphere when it became apparent that Gershom is back and has a few new tricks up his sleeve. It’s shocking and yet so typical of a Super Villain, a classification of which he more than earns – he defines it.

Only once does a reader get into the villain’s head and it was enough to convince me that Gershom deserves to be taken down. For the most part, the book stays in the point of view of both Dana and Aidan and that’s fine with me because there is no question they are the stars of this book and their romance is unconventional to say the least.

Secondary characters abound but they were more than welcomed. Practically every one of them is someone I’ve fallen in love with before in past novels. They do a wonderful job of supporting Aidan and Dana – more than this humble review can reveal. My heart hurts for Seth though. And David. When will it be their turn is what I’d like to know. In this novel I get to see Seth experience extreme emotion which makes him even more alluring as a future hero. I just adore his role and how he really loves the people under his command. They’re family and that theme of family shows itself in surprising and rewarding ways throughout Blade of Darkness.

I usually don’t talk about book covers but for this review I will mention just a couple of things. First, the guy is yummy, that’s a given. But look at his eyes! Finally someone has paid attention to some of the characteristics that make a hero so special. In this case, an Immortal Guardian named Aidan. The cover for this novel rocks!

There is so much more I want to say, to share, to comment on because Blade of Darkness.takes place in a world that is rich, vibrant, and at times almost real, that even when I reached the last page, I didn’t want to leave. Also, I’m guessing here, but Aidan’s ‘as you will’ seems like a nod to the Dread Pirate Roberts in The Princess Bride – a movie I absolutely adore. As he says to Princess Buttercup, ‘as you wish’. I wish Ms. Duvall much success because I want her to continue writing about this world until every Immortal Guardian finds love, until everything Seth fought for and protects is relatively safe, and maybe, just maybe the two lone warriors we all respect will find love too.

Blade of Darkness is a must read, a must have and a book worth the space on a reader’s keeper shelf. Dana and Aidan’s story is extra special and wonderful and I’m thrilled that such a misunderstood hero finally finds a woman to love and cherish. What more could a reader wish? I’m a very, VERY happy reader.

Trouble My Bones by L. Joseph Shosty


Trouble My Bones by L. Joseph Shosty
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Horror, Paranormal, Historical, Action/Adventure, Contemporary
Length: Short Story (115 pages)
Rating: 4 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

In a magical land where demons walk and assassination is exalted as a moral enterprise, Elihu the Poisoner must defend a gentle innkeeper from a gang of cutthroats with only tradition and etiquette as weapons.

On Planet Whiskey, a train rockets towards the northern pole. Onboard, five men play a game of poker, but this is only the beginning of a breathtaking journey into a world of corrupt businessmen, hapless ice harvesters, and the wise, world-weary men in the middle, torn between doing what is right and playing along with an immoral system to get a bigger piece of the post-Earth dream.

A couple of cowboys running a herd to Fort Smith, Arkansas pause in the untraveled wilds to offer tribute to a mysterious creature, and in doing so anger malevolent forces which lurk there.
Trouble My Bones…

A dazzling masterpiece of storytelling, this collection contains ten of L. Joseph Shosty’s best stories. Here, you’ll find pulpy adventure yarns and quieter, more introspective pieces alike, all with Shosty’s unique blend of humor and thought-provoking ideas.

Just because a place looks quiet and ordinary doesn’t mean it won’t surprise you if given the chance.

The main character in “An Incident in Cain’s Mark” travelled to a small town in order to settle the estate of his uncle. Cain’s Mark was no ordinary town, though, and he soon realized that something dangerous happened there after dark every night. The narrator spent a generous amount of time setting the scene before anything out of the ordinary began to occur, so I felt like I’d gotten to know him and the strange community he was visiting well. Knowing that something was terribly wrong there without having any clue what it might be only made me more curious to read more.

One of the few tales in this collection that needed more development was “Crippled Sucker.” The plot followed a group of people playing a high-stakes game of poker while they discussed business deals on an alien planet. I found it difficult to keep track of all of the characters, especially once they started talking about other characters who weren’t in the room. It would have been nice to have more clues about who was who and how they all knew each other. With that being said, the storyline itself was well done and I did enjoy it overall.

“Zombie Love Song” showed what happened after humans found themselves in a long, bloody war with zomboes, which is the name the characters in this universe gave to zombies. The narrator was someone who had trouble adjusting to ordinary life after seeing and participating in so much violence. One of the things I liked the most about his storytelling was how blasé he was about things that would terrify the average person. I didn’t have to be told he’d been permanently changed by his experience. Little details like this were more than enough to show his devastation, and that made his tale impossible to put down.

Trouble My Bones was a solid collection of imaginative science fiction stories. I’d strongly recommend it to everyone who is a fan of this genre.

Little Girl Gone by Margaret Fenton


Little Girl Gone by Margaret Fenton
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Action/Adventure, Contemporary, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Full length (254 pgs)
Rating: 4 stars
Reviewed by Aloe

Claire Conover is back in the sequel to Little Lamb Lost. She has taken a 13-year-old girl into custody after she is found sleeping behind a grocery store. The girl’s murdered mother is found at a construction site owned by a family friend, then the girl disappears. Her mother worked in an illegal gambling industry in Birmingham. Things only get more complicated from there. Is it possible the girl pulled the trigger? She doesn’t have a lot of street smarts, so where could she have run? Claire has to find the answers, and the girl, fast.

She works for the county child welfare division. It’s the beginning of a new school year and she knows her workload will pick up. Teachers see a lot more than they should on the line. They report injuries and she must intercede and get the child help. She gets a phone call about a young girl found sleeping in a box outside. The girl won’t tell them anything…

The first thing Claire does is try to get the girl to talk. All she gets is a name. She is lucky that the home she wants to place her in has an opening. This lady is sincere and helps the children get off to better start in life. The only problem is that as soon as she’s been fed and cleaned up, the girl skips. Then they find out her mother is dead. Did the girl kill her?

The social worker keeps trying to trace her. She meets a lot of volatile people, visits homes she wouldn’t want to live in, finds abuse in other places, and she keeps closing in on the girl. However, will she get there before the killer does?

This is a hard look at family dynamics and expectations. Children experiment, children rebel and children defy. Not all parents react the same way. Some hurt their children in their frustration. That’s inexcusable but it happens. You can tell the author has worked in social work because she’s very honest and believable as you read the story. It flows well and she keeps your mind going trying to figure out what happened before the end.

Like Statues by S. Rose


Like Statues by S. Rose
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Contemporary
Length: Short Story (14 pages)
Other: F/F, Fetish
Rating: 3 Stars
Reviewed by Astilbe

Like most girls, I have a secret or two. One of those secrets just happens to be a fixation with statues.

My tendencies go largely unnoticed, until one night when Valerie, my boss, catches me alone with a company-owned statue.

Confessions ensue, and sparks fly.

Almost nobody can keep a secret forever, especially when it’s about their deepest desires.

One of the things I liked the most about this tale was its descriptions of what it’s like to live in a small town and not fit into the culture there. The author did a wonderful job of showing how lonely that experience can be, especially for people who think they’ll never meet anyone in their rural community who is sympathetic. Understanding this was an important part of understanding why Melanie, the main character, decided to hide her statue fetish so well from everyone she worked with. I was glad that so much attention was paid to this part of the plot because of this.

The chemistry between Melanie and Valerie never felt right to me. While they shared similar sexual tastes, they didn’t have much else in common. As much as I wanted to root for them to end up together, it would have been nice to have a few more reasons to hope for that kind of ending. There simply wasn’t enough information about what kind of people they were and why they’d be good for each other for me to make up my mind about that.

The dialogue was nicely written. There were times when it made me giggle in a good way because of how dramatic Melanie could be when things weren’t exactly going her way. This definitely wasn’t something I was expecting to find in an erotic tale, but it was a nice addition to the storyline. I also enjoyed seeing how things between her and Valerie played out once Valerie realized what was happening in the sculpture garden.

I’d recommend Like Statues to anyone who is in the mood for a short, steamy read.

Trust with Hearts by Kelli A. Wilkins


Trust with Hearts by Kelli A. Wilkins
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Contemporary
Length: Full Length (330 pgs)
Heat Level: Spicy
Rating: 4 stars
Reviewed by Mistflower

After a bitter breakup, Sherrie Parker seeks refuge at her cousin Dave’s house in rural West Virginia. Early one morning, she runs into Dave’s other houseguest, a singer named Curtis Taylor. The last thing Sherrie wants is to share living quarters with a country music crooner – even if he is sexy, in a cowboy sort of way.

Thrown together by circumstances, Sherrie and Curtis get off to a rocky start, but soon discover they have more in common than they ever imagined. Unable to fight their growing attraction, they give in to their desires and start a sizzling summer romance.

Everything is perfect between them until Sherrie discovers that Curtis is keeping secrets from her – and his biggest secret of all will change everything. Can their newfound love survive, or will destiny keep them apart forever?

For me to stay up until 1am to finish the book knowing I have to get up at 6am for work tells you it must have been a good book. I hate when I do that though because then I’m very tired and miserable the next day. However, whenever I thought of the book it would make me smile and I knew then, it was worth it and I’d do it again.

I’m such a sucker for this type of story. I can’t reveal why because the synopsis only says “Sherrie discovers that Curtis is keeping secrets from her and his biggest secret of all will change everything.” This “biggest secret” is my favorite kind of plot. Kelli A. Wilkins’ writing style gave this classic love story a fresh look and appeal. I also enjoyed the setting in which the story was set. There were many little things that just gave this book the extra added touch. I enjoyed the implementation of the cats. I did notice the clever connection of the book title incorporated into the story.

Sherrie Parker, the heroine, wasn’t perfect. She cried a little too often but I loved how Curtis, the hero, would comfort her. I fell in love with them immediately when they first met because the entire situation had me laughing. At times Curtis’s secrets were annoying and I just wanted him to tell Sherrie but I understood why he couldn’t. I do need to point out that their relationship was definitely spicy. I started to sweat a little bit.

I got a little nervous in chapter eleven. There was a big bump for me. I almost couldn’t get past it. I still scowl when I think of it. Sherrie did something with someone that I thought was the most stupid thing to do,  the worst decision she could have made. I don’t think anyone in their right mind would have done what she did. Fortunately, I had strong feelings towards Curtis and curiosity in other matters so I was able to get past that plot quirk.

For the most part the story was aesthetically pleasing to me from start to end. Trust with Hearts was a heartwarming story that I thoroughly enjoyed. I would honestly recommend this book, especially to fans of cowboys and country music.

His Little Lanie by Keri Ford


His Little Lanie by Keri Ford
Fairy Tales in a Small Town, Book 2
Publisher: Self-Published
Genre: Contemporary
Length: Full length (158 pgs)
Heat Level: Spicy
Rating: 3.5 stars
Reviewed by Mistflower

Just a girl in love with a guy who doesn’t know she exists. The story of Lanie Lange’s life. She rescued Eriksen from drowning when they were teenagers, but she wasn’t supposed to be there. He suffered a head injury in the accident, and he doesn’t remember her involvement. Another woman took credit for her rescue. Eriksen’s back in town now, and Lanie is dying to tell him the truth about that night. There’s just one problem. She has no proof.

Eriksen Sanders got caught up in the moment and found himself married to the wrong person. Divorced and moved home, he’s aiming to get focused and help bring about the new vibe to Happily. Only there’s something about Lanie he can’t figure out. An unexplainable pull and gut feeling that he’s met the woman before. Determined to find out, he does his best to corner her for the truth, but she constantly slips through his fingers.

In the waters of Maiden Lake, they find common ground. There the secrets about more than either of them expect begin to unravel.

His Little Lanie is a small town contemporary romance retelling of the classic fairy tale, The Little Mermaid.

The premise of the story was alluring and it definitely had some uniqueness to it. The synopsis intrigued me and I was further pleased with the writing style. Apparently this is the second book in a series. I didn’t know that until I finished it therefore it’s safe to say that it can be read as a standalone. However, I am curious to read the first book in the series since I did grow fond of the cast of characters.

The hero in this story was Eriksen. My opinion of Eriksen was that he wasn’t quite developmentally appropriate for his age. He had this youngness about him. He was divorced, a pilot and a man but something was off. I had the same feelings regarding the heroine, Lanie. They just had this innocent sweetness about them. It didn’t take away from my enjoyment of the book since I was able to rationalize that their relationship was unique to their story, and that they shared a past history which only makes sense if you read the book, then you’d know what I’m talking about. I did laugh quite hard when Eriksen entered the water for the first time. That was a bit unrealistic but hilarious.

The author does tell the reader that this story is a contemporary romance retelling of the classic fairy tale, The Little Mermaid. I can see the connections threaded throughout the plot and rather enjoyed the cleverness. Especially the “tail” detail. That was smile provoking. A genuine feel good moment.

The synopsis said “Sometimes we just need a mental break and we’re looking for that comfort read book to take the day away.” That was the perfect description. I did enjoy the entire story from beginning to end. I consistently turned the pages looking forward to the happily ever after at the end in which I wasn’t disappointed.

I enjoyed reading His Little Lanie while I was home recovering from a minor surgery. It was the perfect read to distract me from my worries. Thank you Keri Ford for this unique and entertaining read. I do recommend other readers to pick up this book and enjoy this sweet fairy tale.