STUFF YOUR STOCKING BLOGFEST: PATY JAGER

PhotobucketSouth for the WinterThere have been a few winters when my husband and I wonder if maybe we would like to be “snowbirds”. Here in Oregon “snowbirds” are retired people who go south for the winter. Usually towing trailers or driving motor homes to Arizona, New Mexico, and even Mexico. Some have houses they live in during the winter months to avoid the snow and cold here up north.

We aren’t retired yet. So, it’s something we can keep thinking about. Our main concern is the fact we aren’t ones to sit around playing cards or working on hobbies. We like to get out and be physical. With this in mind about ourselves(We didn’t do well on a cruise)our next option is flying to a warm tropical place during the coldest part of the winter. We could hike and sightsee and enjoy the warm weather while everything back home is under snow and frozen. Maybe be gone a long weekend or a week, but no longer.

We’ve yet to try this adventure for lack of someone to feed the cattle while we’re gone. But one of these days, when we no longer have cattle, we are going to fly south to a tropical island.

Do you have “snowbirds” in your area who head south in the winter? Are you a “snowbird”? If so, what is your favorite place to winter?

I’ll be choosing one person who comments to win a Christmas ornament. Please leave an e-mail address so I can contact you for mailing information.

If you prefer reading about tropical places to traveling there, my latest action adventure romance, Secrets of a Mayan Moon, is set in the Guatemalan jungle.

Child prodigy and now Doctor of Anthropology, Isabella Mumphrey, is about to lose her job at the university. In the world of publish or perish, her mentor’s request for her assistance on a dig is just the opportunity she’s been seeking. If she can decipher an ancient stone table—and she can—she’ll keep her department. She heads to Guatemala, but drug trafficking bad guys, artifact thieves, and her infatuation for her handsome guide wreak havoc on her scholarly intentions.

DEA agent Tino Kosta, is out to avenge the deaths of his family. He’s deep undercover as a jaguar tracker and sometimes jungle guide, but the appearance of a beautiful, brainy anthropologist heats his Latin blood taking him on a dangerous detour that could leave them both casualties of the jungle.

Secrets of a Mayan Moon is available at Kindle, Nook, and Smashwords.

About the Author: Wife, mother, grandmother, and the one who cleans pens and delivers the hay; award winning author Paty Jager and her husband currently ranch 350 acres when not dashing around visiting their children and grandchildren. She not only writes the western lifestyle, she lives it.

She is a member of RWA, COWG, EOWG, and EPIC. Her contemporary Western, Perfectly Good Nanny won the 2008 Eppie for Best Contemporary Romance, Spirit of the Mountain, a historical paranormal set among the Nez Perce, garnered 1st place in the paranormal category of the Lories Best Published Book Contest.

You can learn more about Paty at her blog, her website, or on Facebook and Twitter @patyjag.

 

Anniversary Blog Fest: Paty Jager

Photobucket
My Summer Powwow Experience
by
Paty Jager

This summer I made the trek back to the county where I grew up and joined in the celebration of the past, present, and future of the Wallowa Band of Nez Perce in Northeast Oregon.

While growing up in the county the only presence I knew of the tribe was the statue at the head of Wallowa Lake and when the Nez Perce would show up for the Chief Joseph Days rodeo.

The Tamkaliks Celebration is the return of the Wallowa Band to the valley. The celebration is held on land they now own near Wallowa. It is slowly being made into an interpretive center where visitors and the locals can learn about the people who first inhabited the fertile valley raising fast, sure-footed appaloosas and living off the land.

The celebration opened with the entrance of the riders who rode their horses from Umatilla to Wallowa for the event. They rode around the round house and then dismounted. One man led a horse. This symbolized a tribal member who died this past year. After a prayer to the horses, the riders entered the round house and more prayers and thanks were given. I enjoyed the mixture of Christian prayer with prayers said in Nez Perce.

There was a flag ceremony with the American, Canadian, and military flags and feather staffs carried in with the dancers in full costumes following behind.

After the flag ceremony we were all asked to come down and join in the Friendship dance. I joined in along with another writer I met at the event. The friendship dance entailed stepping to the beat of the drum and moving sideways in a large circle. Then the elders peeled off the circle and walked in the opposite direction, shaking hands.

There was a break as they worked on the parachute covering. The strong winds the night before had ripped it in several spots. This gave me a chance to check out the vendors and visit. The craftsmanship of the items for sale surpassed anything you see in stores that proclaim they are selling “Indian” jewelry. I enjoyed a visit with a husband and wife. She was Cherokee and he was Choctaw. They invited me to their powwow in September in Idaho. I’d love to go but doubt I can fit it into my schedule.

The afternoon was filled with dancing and dance competitions. The beat of the drums felt like the heart beat of the earth as the dancers moved to the pulse and language of their ancestors.

Unfortunately the heat, and I believe the meal I had the night before, took a toll on me and I didn’t stick around for the adult contests, though I saw some wonderful costumes and individuals I would have liked to see dance. I had a two hour drive back to my daughter’s and left to make sure I made it back.

I was invited to come back next year and I’ve already marked it on my calendar.

If you haven’t been to a powwow, I highly recommend you go. It will fill you with a new gratitude for life, nature, and people.

Paty Jager

Website:http://www.patyjager.net

Blog: http://www.patyjager.blogspot.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/paty.jager

Twitter: @patyjag

GUEST BLOG: PATY JAGER

Photobucket

What would you do if you were being pushed from your home because someone else signed papers saying you would move? That’s what happened to the nontreaty Nez Perce.

The Nez Perce tribe is made up of bands. Each band had its own territory, a head chief, elders, medicine man, and families who lived together. They traveled back and forth through each others territories hunting, fishing, trading, and visiting. But they each had their own areas where they wintered, summered and buried their people.

In 1855 the first treaty was signed. This treaty gave the Nez Perce bands nearly all of their territories. But the discovery of gold within those boundaries brought about another treat in 1863. This treaty drastically reduced the reservation and didn’t include several of the larger bands territories. These bands refused to sign the treaty and continued to live on what they considered their homeland.

By 1877 the Indians began feeling the pressure of the whites moving into their land and many tribes warred with the army and killed settlers. The nontreaty Nez Perce continued to try and live with the whites but found it increasingly harder to ignore the whites’ acts against the Nez Perce. July of 1877 as many bands camped together gathering camas, racing horses, and talking of the intrusion of the whites and the army ordering them to the reservation, three young men rode up upon a white man who had killed one of the young men’s uncle. The brave snapped and killed the whiteman. That began the four month long and 1,170 mile march of the Nez Perce to find freedom.

Spirit of the Sky is the third book of my spirit trilogy. It takes place during the exodus of the Nez Perce as they sought freedom. The heroine is a Nez Perce spirit who as a bald eagle watches over the Lake Nimiipuu (Wallowa Nez Perce-Chief Joseph’s band) from the sky.

The trilogy follows the Lake Nimiipuu from before the white man arrives in their area- Spirit of the Mountain with a white wolf spirit hero- and right after the whiteman arrives – Spirit of the lake where the bull elk spirit who resides in the lake helps a Nimiipuu maiden prove the traitorous nature of a whiteman believed to be a friend of the Lake Nimmipuu, to the third book – Spirit of the Sky, Sa-qan’s story.

Sa-qan and her brothers, Himiin and Wewukiye were made spirits by the Creator after their father’s greed killed the warriors of their village. Centuries later the three find themselves attracted to mortals and experiencing emotions they only felt when mortal.

To save her from oppression, he must save her whole tribe. To give her his heart, he must desert his career…

When the US Army forces the Nimiipuu from their land, Sa-qan, the eagle spirit entrusted with watching over her tribe, steps in to save her mortal niece. Challenging the restrictions of the spirit world, Sa-qan assumes human form and finds an unexpected ally in a handsome cavalry officer.

Certain she is a captive, Lt. Wade Watts, a Civil War veteran, tries to help the blonde woman he finds sheltering a Nez Perce child. While her intelligent eyes reveal she understands his language, she refuses his help. But when Wade is wounded, it is the beautiful Sa-qan who tends him. Wade wishes to stop the killing—Sa-qan will do anything to save her people.

Can their differences save her tribe? Or will their love spell the end of the Nimiipuu?

About the Author:Wife, mother, grandmother, and the one who cleans pens and delivers the hay; award winning author Paty Jager and her husband currently ranch 350 acres when not dashing around visiting their children and grandchildren. She not only writes the western lifestyle, she lives it.
She is a member of RWA, EPIC , and COWG. She’s had eleven books and a short story published so far and is venturing into the new world of self-publishing ebooks. Her contemporary Western, Perfectly Good Nanny won the 2008 Eppie for Best Contemporary Romance and Spirit of the Mountain, a historical paranormal set among the Nez Perce, garnered 1st place in the paranormal category of the Lories Best Published Book Contest.
You can learn more about her at her blog:www.patyjager.blogspot.com; her website: www.PatyJager.net or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/paty.jager and Twitter: @patyjag. Contest! At each stop I’m giving away a $5 Amazon gift certificate to a lucky commenter.

Each blog stop has a picture of an eagle in the post. Follow the tour and send me the number of different pictures you saw while following the tour. If there is more than one correct entry I’ll draw a winner on May 21st to receive a $25 gift certificate to either Barnes and Nobles or Amazon, a handmade custom ereader cover, and chocolate.

Stuff Your Stocking Blogfest: Paty Jager

Kissing under the Mistletoe

Mistletoe is one of the traditions of the Christmas Season. But did you know—

Mistletoe is an evergreen. The traditions of displaying evergreens at Christmas came about as a way to bring color and the green hope of spring into the home.

This plant however is a parasitic shrub. It grows on trees, living off the host plant. They are not full parasites, since the plants are capable of photosynthesis. But these mistletoe plants are parasitic in the sense that they send a special kind of root system down into their hosts, the trees upon which they grow, in order to extract nutrients from the trees.

Mistletoe has long been regarded as an aphrodisiac and fertility herb. It may also possess abortifacient qualities, which would help explain its association with uninhibited sexuality.

The unusual botanical history of mistletoe goes a long way towards explaining the awe in which it was held in the Norse myths. For in spite of not being rooted in the soil, mistletoe remained green throughout the winter, while the trees upon which it grew and upon which it fed did not (the European mistletoe often grows on apple trees; more rarely on oaks). This little plant remaining green while the host plant died fascinated the unscientific masses.

The folklore, and the magical powers of this plant, spread through the centuries It was thought placing a sprig in a baby’s cradle would protect the child from faeries. Giving a sprig to the first cow calving after New Year would protect the entire herd.

Ancient Scandinavia and the Norse mythology is where the tale of kissing und the mistletoe started. It was considered a plant of peace in Scandinavian history. If enemies found themselves under mistletoe in the forest they laid down their weapons and called a truce until the next day.

Most say kissing under the mistletoe is an English custom even though there is a story that dates back to Norse mythology. It is about an overprotective mother.

The Norse god Balder was the best loved of all the gods. His mother was Frigga, goddess of love and beauty. She loved her son so much that she wanted to make sure no harm would come to him. So she went through the world, securing promises from everything that sprang from the four elements–fire, water, air, and earth–that they would not harm her beloved Balder.

Leave it to Loki, a sly, evil spirit, to find the loophole. The loophole was mistletoe. He made an arrow from its wood. To make the prank even nastier, he took the arrow to Hoder, Balder’s brother, who was blind. Guiding Holder’s hand, Loki directed the arrow at Balder’s heart, and he fell dead.

Frigga’s tears became the mistletoe’s white berries. In the version of the story with a happy ending, Balder is restored to life, and Frigga is so grateful that she reverses the reputation of the offending plant–making it a symbol of love and promising to bestow a kiss upon anyone who passes under it.

Is hanging mistletoe a tradition in your family?

My holiday gift to readers is a free novella that can be downloaded from Kindle, Nook. Ibook or Smashwords until January 1st. Christmas Redemption is a western historical romance novella.

Wife, mother, grandmother, and the one who cleans pens and delivers the hay; award winning author Paty Jager and her husband currently farm 350 acres when not dashing around visiting their children and grandchildren. She not only writes the western lifestyle, she lives it.

Paty Jager is a member of RWA, EPIC, WW, and COWG. Romance publisher Wild Rose Press has published soon to be ten books and a short story. She is venturing into the new world of self-publishing ebooks. She edited for an e-publisher for four and a half years and teaches workshops at conferences, writers meetings, and online.

Her contemporary Western, Perfectly Good Nanny, won the 2008 Eppie for Best Contemporary Romance and Spirit of the Mountain, a historical paranormal set among the Nez Perce, garnered 1st place in the paranormal category of the Lories Best Published Book Contest.

You can learn more about her at her blog:www.patyjager.blogspot.com; her website: http://www.patyjager.net or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/paty.jager and Twitter: @patyjag.

GUEST BLOG: PATY JAGER

“Great Karma”

A friend sent me an e-mail for “Great Karma”. The very first thing on the list was: Take into account that great love and great achievement involve great risk.

This statement had me staring at it and not pushing the button to go on. This is so true in life and in how a writer should go about thinking about a story.

Risk and love-

In life, you give your love to someone but that doesn’t mean it will be taken and you can end up shattered when it’s thrown back in your face.

In a story, you want one or both of your characters to be fearful of committing to the other or loving them- it makes great conflict, but it also makes them vulnerable a trait everyone can relate to and root for.

Risk and Achievement-

In life, everyone struggles to achieve something whether it’s getting out of a wheelchair and they risk falling or they’ve put money into something, or you’ve put all your emotions into a book and you’re looking for an agent/editor/ good review. Risk is something that is always knocking on the door and you can either hide from it and never try to achieve anything or do your best and hope the risk pays off.

In a story, risk is what keeps the story moving forward- it’s the momentum that keeps the character charging to the end and if all goes well they achieve their goal. It may not be the one they first started out wanting, but they end up finding out the risk was worth the reward or sacrifice.

That is the process for writing a great romance. What books have you read lately that the hero or heroine took a risk to love the other?

In my spirit trilogy the spirits risk all they’ve believed in for season upon season when they fall in love with a mortal.

Paty

Wife, mother, grandmother, and the one who cleans pens and delivers the hay; award winning author Paty Jager and her husband currently farm 350 acres when not dashing around visiting their children and grandchildren. She not only writes the western lifestyle, she lives it.

Paty is a member of RWA, EPIC, and COWG. Wild Rose Press has published nine of her books. Perfectly Good Nanny won the 2008 EPPIE for Best Contemporary Romance. She edited for an e-publisher for four and a half years and teaches workshops at conferences, writers meetings, and online.

You can learn more about her at her blog: www.patyjager.blogspot.com; her website: http://www.PatyJager.net or on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/#!/paty.jager.

Photobucket

GUEST BLOG: PATY JAGER

The second book in my Native American paranormal historical trilogy is Spirit of the Lake. This book as with the first one, Spirit of the Mountain, is set among the Nez Perce band famous for their leader Chief Joseph and who summered in Wallowa County where I grew up. The trilogy is set among the same band of Nez Perce or Nimiipuu as they call themselves with sibling spirits as main characters in each book.

In Spirit of the Lake, the heroine is pregnant. Learning all I could about Nez Perce customs and social living aspects centered around pregnancy and child birth back then took hours of reading books on the Nez Perce and gleaning the tidbits I found stuck in here and there. And emailing my Nez Perce contact with questions I couldn’t find in the books.

Pregnant women still did most of the chores right up until the moment they started labor. Some would have miscarriages from long periods of riding horses in the last months of pregnancy. This usually occurred during campaigns of fighting when the women and children were kept moving to stay ahead of the enemies attacking them.

If a woman was pregnant they believed her man would have bad luck hunting. She was also not allowed to see any part of a kill—blood, skinning. They feared if a pregnant woman saw this her child would be born deformed. They also didn’t touch, view, or ridicule any deformed animals or humans, fearing it would cause their child the same misfortune. They didn’t tie knots or do things symbolic of obstructing the birth.

A wide strip of buckskin was tied around their bellies. This was believed to protect the child. After the birth, this strip was burned or buried, giving the child a healthy, strong body. They did everything to keep the baby safe. The Nez Perce wanted to build a large, strong tribe.

This is just a miniscule picture of what I’ve learned and incorporated into Spirit of the Lake.

Blurb for Spirit of the Lake:

Two generations after his brother became mortal, Wewukiye, the lake spirit, prevents a Nimiipuu maiden from drowning and becomes caught up in her sorrow and her heart. Her tribe ignores Dove’s shameful accusations—a White man took her body, leaving her pregnant, and he plans to take their land.Wewukiye vows to care for her until she gives birth, to help her prove the White man is deceitful and restore her place in her tribe.

As they travel on their quest for justice, Dove reveals spiritual abilities yet unknown in her people, ensnaring Wewukiye’s respect and awe. But can love between a mortal and a spirit grow without consequences?

Excerpt

Wewukiye tugged her hand, drawing her closer. His warm breath puffed against her ear.

“You need only think of me and you will have strength.”

His soft silky voice floated through her body like a hot drink.

Dove swallowed the lump in her throat and asked, “When will I see you again?” The thought of sleeping on the hard ground next to the fire in Crazy One’s dwelling didn’t sound near as inviting as using his lap to rest her head.

The days and nights grew colder; to be wrapped in his arms would warm her through and through.

“You will find me at the meadow every day when the sun is directly overhead.” He brushed his lips against her ear.

She closed her eyes, relishing the silky feel of his lips and the heat of his touch.

“Think of me,” whispered through her head.

Dove opened her eyes. She stood alone. Her palm still warm from their clasped hands, her ear ringing with his whisper.

*~*~*

You can find it in print and ebook at The Wild Rose Press or at Amazon and Kindle.

This post is part of my blog tour. Leave a comment on as many of my guest blogs at you can and the person who travels with me the most will receive an autographed copy of Spirit of the Lake, a sweatshirt, and cowboy chocolate. To find all the places I’m visiting go to my blog: www.patyjager.blogspot.com. The contest runs from May 18th – May 29th covering thirteen blogs. I’ll notify the winner on May 30th. In the event of a tie I will draw a name.

To read more about the spirit trilogy or my other books visit my website: www.PatyJager.net

Judy and Marianne, thank you for having me here today.

Paty

Wife, mother, grandmother, and the one who cleans pens and delivers the hay; award winning author Paty Jager and her husband currently farm 350 acres when not dashing around visiting their children and grandchildren. She not only writes the western lifestyle, she lives it.

Paty is a member of RWA, EPIC, and COWG. Wild Rose Press has published nine of her books. Perfectly Good Nanny, won the 2008 EPPIE for Best Contemporary Romance. She edited for an e-publisher for four and a half years and teaches workshops at conferences, writers meetings, and online.

You can learn more about her at her blog; www.patyjager.blogspot.com her website; http://www.patyjager.net or on Facebook; https://www.facebook.com/#!/paty.jager.

Sources: Nez Perce Women in Transition, 1877-1990- Caroline James; NeeMePoo – Allen P. Slickpoo Sr. and Deward E. Walker Jr.

SPRING IS BUSTIN’ OUT ALL OVER: PATY JAGER

Spring- A few of my favorite things.
The lengthening days and bright green tips of plants poking out of the warming earth are my favorite things about spring.
The early morning sun peeking out and spreading a fresh glow through my bedroom window before the alarm goes off makes waking so much easier. Six o’clock comes early enough but when it’s in the dark during the winter I have to drag myself out of bed. Yet, come summer time when it’s light at five a.m. I can get up before six and head out to change the irrigation water with a light heart and spring in my step. And it’s light past dinner and I can go out and putter around the yard, sprucing things up for the new spring arrivals.
I get giddy when the first signs of spring; the Mountain Bluebird flutters around the fields and the flowers start peeking through the mulch. The bright green of Daffodil stems pushing out from their winter hiding flashes hope that winter was a fleeting thing and the land will soon be alive with color. The new buds on the barberry bushes and the purplish shoots of the peony all add to the colorful palate nature reveals after coating the land in shades of gray and white all winter.
In my book, Spirit of the Mountain, the Nimiipuu (Nez Perce) return to their summer home at the start of the story. Wren, the heroine and daughter of the chief, holds the mountain in her heart. When they are far from the mountain in their winter home, she yearns for the flowers, trees, and great granite boulders of her mountain. The creatures of the mountain and all it nurtures fill her with happiness.
So in a way, I think the part of me that I captured in Wren is my love of spring flowers, nature, and desperately trying to do what is right even when it feels wrong.
What is your favorite thing about spring?
Paty Jager
http://www.patyjager.net
Wife, mother, grandmother, and the one who cleans pens and delivers the hay; award winning author Paty Jager and her husband currently farm 350 acres when not dashing around visiting their children and grandchildren. She not only writes the western lifestyle, she lives it.
Paty Jager is a member of RWA, EPIC, and COWG. Wild Rose Press has published eight of her books with Spirit of the Lake to release in May 2011.  Perfectly Good Nanny, won the 2008 EPPIE for Best Contemporary Romance.  She edited for an e-publisher for four and a half years and teaches workshops at conferences, writers meetings, and online.
You can learn more about her at her blog; http://www.patyjager.blogspot.com/  her website; http://www.patyjager.net/ or on Facebook.

Jingle Bell Blog Fest: Paty Jager



Click here and tell us when Paty writes her holiday letter for a chance to win a  $50 Amazon or Barnes and Noble gift certificate.



Holiday Frenzy
At this time of year it seems like the days are literally shorter, not just the daylight. Candy and cookies to make, not to mention the infamous fruitcake if that’s one of your family traditions. Buying and wrapping presents, decorating… It all seems to cause more anxiety than what the holiday originated from.
I’ve found that by prioritizing what needs to get done and tackling the major things first I can find the time to relax, enjoy a good book or short story about the holidays. I also listen to upbeat Christmas music while I’m tackling the holiday tasks.
I like to make gingerbread people for all my immediate family members. Before our kids were married it included my brothers’ and my husband’s sister’s families. Now it’s my children, their spouses, and the grandkids, plus the great grandparents. This is one of the first things I tackle because I hang them on the tree. They are part of my ornaments. For the families that can’t be here, I put their cookies together for a photo and send it to them.
Baking is done in the evenings while I’m watching TV. (My kitchen opens into the living room) The holiday letter is written in November so I can get it out early. Cards to friends go out the middle of the month. (both mailed and e-cards).
Decorating happens from Thanksgiving on. I pull a box of decorations out and put them up as I feel like it. When that box is done, I pull out another one. The process of decorating is ongoing through out the month of December. After all, the only ones who see it until the actual holiday season are my husband and I.
Gifts—I pick those up starting in October and go until the first of December. I keep a list of what I’ve purchased and who gets what so I can keep an even amount among the grandchildren and make sure the adult kids are happy, too.  I could save myself time, money and effort by sending gift cards to the families in Alaska but then I couldn’t give each of them my own special love. I always try and make something for the grandkids. My mom has been gone for twenty years, but my girls still have pillows and dolls she made for them. 

Now that I have my list and know when to do what, I can sit back, listen to Christmas carols and make the bookmarks for my newest release- Bridled Hearts.

How about you-Are the holidays a time to enjoy family or a time of anxiety and frenzy?
Award winning author Paty Jager has seven books published with The Wild Rose Press. Her first contemporary western received the EPPIE award and her second has been released and is available for purchase here.  Paty not only writes the western lifestyle she lives it. She and her husband of 32 years have 160 acres they ranch when not chasing around visiting grandchildren.

GUEST BLOG: PATY JAGER

How Much Research is too much?

None!

Unless you’re only researching and not writing or your fiction novel reads like a text book.

Research is the way to make a story or book come alive, take shape, and educate while entertaining your audience. At least that’s the way I feel about research. I think there is never too much you can research about anything you write about. I have the first book of a trilogy released that is set in the 1700’s among a band of Nez Perce. I researched their way of life, found Nez Perce who were willing to help me make the story correct, learned about shape shifting for the paranormal element, and studied the myth and legends of the Nez Perce so when I wrote the story I could make it as authentic sounding as possible.

Now you say, all well and good, that was a historical story.

I’m working on a contemporary right now, and I’ve put as much if not more research into making it ring true. It’s set in the Guatemalan jungle. So I’ve had to read maps, go to online sites about the government, read newspaper articles about what is happening there, and I’ve made a contact who has given me information not only on the country but the people so I can make the story as authentic as possible. Knowing they are a Spanish speaking country I could have just used Spanish words here and there, but I learned all Central and South American countries have their own slang. So I’m digging into that and asking the local person what words would be used for certain things. I also have one character who is Venezuelan. I’ve had to do some researching on that to make him ring true.

I could have just written the story with Spanish language and a few online sites as my research, but then the story wouldn’t have been accurate. As my contact in Guatemala said, “I appreciate the fact you are going to great lengths to show the real Guatemala. Many books I read, the writer doesn’t have a clue what we are about and they lose me as a reader.” So while the larger populace may not have a care about the difference in the language, or the fact the rain forest has been getting smaller and smaller due to fires, those people from or who live in the countries will know I have taken the extra care to get it right.

Great research resources are your local, state, and university libraries; historical museums or societies; in the case of other countries, their government websites; or googling a certain area. For maps I like Google Earth and Mapquest. And always try to find at least two sources with the same information. Especially if you’re using online information. And if you can find a person in a particular field you are using or living in a country you are writing about it makes the story come to life with tidbits that only someone in that field or that country would know.

Paty Jager

www.patyjager.net

www.patyjager.blogspot.com

Wife, mother, grandmother, and the one who cleans pens and delivers the hay; award winning author Paty Jager has brought her husband of thirty-one years to maturity, along with four children. Currently the empty nesters farm 130 acres. She not only writes the western lifestyle, she lives it.

Paty has been a member of RWA for twelve years belonging to several online chapters as well as EPIC, Women Writing the West, and Central Oregon Writers Guild.

She has five historical western romance novels, one paranormal historical, and one contemporary western available through The Wild Rose Press. Her contemporary western won the 2008 Best Contemporary Romance EPPIE. To learn more about Paty drop by her website: http://www.patyjager.net To purchase her books to go http://www.thewildrosepress.com or any e-book or print outlet.

GUEST BLOG: PATY JAGER

My June release, Doctor in Petticaots, has a woman doctor as the heroine. While researching to not only find out about women doctor’s in the late 1800’s I also discovered a little about medicine at that time.

One good source was the book Pioneer Doctor: The Story of a Woman’s Work by Mari Grana. This is a story of the author’s grandmother who became a doctor in 1890 and first worked in the Montana mining country. The book describes some of the doctoring practices. The one that caught my attention and I had to look it up was the use of “adhesive bandages” for broken bones. That seemed too modern. Come to find out they were using “adhesive” bandages made of cotton bandages with plaster of Paris rubbed into the weave in 1851. A Dutch doctor first started using that method even though they had been pouring the liquid plaster into wooden boxes built around the legs for a while.

In some instances, the doctors would have two bags ready to take with them. One for regular medical care and one filled with the necessary equipment for birthing. Here is just a brief list of contents that could be in a doctor’s bag in the late 1800’s.

Obstetrical tools (some of these were pretty horrendous looking)
Tongue depressor
Ear spoon
Catheter/irrigator
Forceps
Catgut sutures
Glass syringe
Needles
Chloroform
Antiseptic soap
Peroxide of hydrogen
Laudanum
Drainage tubes
Percussion hammer
Stethoscope
Adhesive bandage
Clean rolls of bandage
Scissors
Scalpel

And the list could go on. The physicians of the 1800’s and early 1900’s had to carry practically their whole practice with them in order to be ready for whatever they found at the end of their sometimes long ride or late night summons.

Doctor Rachel Tarkiel, the heroine in Doctor in Petticoats, is struggling for acceptance in a male occupation. She had to settle for the only job her gender and her father’s influence could get her- resident doctor at a blind school. Little did she know this is the very place she can learn to accept herself and find a man who believes in her skill.

Blurb:

After a life-altering accident and a failed relationship, Dr. Rachel Tarkiel gave up on love and settled for a life healing others as the physician at a School for the Blind. She’s happy in her vocation–until handsome Clay Halsey shows up and inspires her to want more.

Blinded by a person he considered a friend, Clay curses his circumstances and his limitations. Intriguing Dr. Tarkiel shows him no pity, though. To her, he’s as much a man as he ever was.

Can these two wounded souls conquer outside obstacles, as well as their own internal fears, and find love?

Excerpt:

“I’m going to look in your other eye now.” She, again, placed a hand on his face and opened the eyelids, stilling her fluttering heart as she pressed close. His clean-shaven face had a couple small nicks on the edges of his angular cheeks. The spice of his shave soap lingered on his skin.

She resisted the urge to run her cheek against his. The heat of his face under her palm and his breath moving wisps of wayward hair caused her to close her eyes and pretend for a few seconds he could be her husband. A man who loved her and wouldn’t be threatened by her occupation or sickened by her hideous scar.

His breathing quickened. A hand settled on her waist, slid around to her back, and drew her forward. Her hand, holding the lens, dropped to his shoulder, and she opened her eyes. This behavior on both their parts was unconscionable, but her constricted throat wouldn’t allow her to utter the rebuke.

Clay sensed the moment the doctor slid from professional to aroused woman. The hand on his cheek caressed rather than held, her breathing quickened, and her scent invaded his senses like a warm summer rain.

Wife, mother, grandmother, and the one who cleans pens and delivers the hay; award winning author Paty Jager has brought her husband of thirty-one years to maturity, along with four children. Currently the empty nesters farm 130 acres. She not only writes the western lifestyle, she lives it.
Paty has been a member of RWA for twelve years and has taught workshops at chapter meetings, conferences, and online.

She has four historical western romance novels available through The Wild Rose Press and one contemporary western, which won the 2008 Best Contemporary Romance EPPIE. She has two new releases this year, one a paranormal historical, Spirit of the Mountain, set among the Nez Perce and the fourth book in the Halsey brother’s series, Doctor in Petticoats. She is also excited about her recently contracted contemporary western, Bridled Heart. To learn more about Paty drop by her website: http://www.patyjager.net