LASR Anniversary: Karla Brandenburg

anniversary post header 500 pixels 2016

This post is part of Long and Short Review’s 9th Anniversary Celebration. Enter the Rafflecopter at the end of the post for a chance to win a $100 gift card or other prizes.

Summer Memories

I look forward to summer every year. After a Chicago winter, the summer sun is like a warm kiss on your face, a smile after the cold snow and sleet of winter.

When I was a kid, summer meant endless hours on the tennis courts and afternoons at the community swimming pool to cool off. Strawberry picking, blueberry picking, picnicking with family and friends. As night descended, the kids in the neighborhood played ghost in the graveyard or chased lightning bugs or we laid on our backs and stared at the stars. If it rained, we had the perfect excuse to stay inside and read a good book.

Summer vacations for my family generally meant loading up the car and driving into Wisconsin to visit relatives, most notably the farm where my mother grew up. For us “city kids,” we got a taste of jumping into the hay bales in the barn and walking through the pastures with the cows and the sheep. Picking food from the garden for the dinner table and a bowl of strawberries at every meal.

Injuries prevent me from playing tennis these days. I have my own strawberry garden which supplies me with fresh fruit for those picnics with family and friends. Now, Summer brings farmer’s markets and fresh produce and outdoor concerts. For me, I work a seasonal job and summer marks an end to mayhem and madness at work, which means that like when I was a kid, summer is vacation time! Summer is the time of year I get out and about and experience new things, the time when I can give free rein to my imagination and capture it all with “bonus” writing time. And on those rainy days? Those are still the best days to curl up in a chair and read a book.

Do you have any favorite summer memories from when you were a kid? Trips to the lake or to the beach? Vacation time with family?

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000038_00069]To escape notoriety from her role in the school shooting she barely survived, Elizabeth Lambert moves from Houston to Hoffman Grove, Illinois. Plagued by panic attacks and nightmares, she’s determined to embrace her second chance at life, knowing that death could take her in an instant. A one-night stand with a local handsome firefighter should remind her that she’s alive, but like a good cookie, once is not enough to satisfy her craving. Will he reject her when he learns about the blood on her hands?

Firefighter and paramedic Matt Billings fights his attraction to the alluring new bookshop manager. She dangles a one-night stand under his nose, but the last time he gave in to such an offer he ended up with a child. He is determined to be a better man than his philandering father. Can he convince Elizabeth that her past is not as terrifying as suddenly being a parent, and a relationship is worth more than just a checkbox on her bucket list?

About the Author: Karla Brandenburg is the author of contemporary romance, including her award-winning paranormal MIST series. First published in 2002, she is a member of the Romance Writers of America. Raised on the gothic romances of Victoria Holt and the horror of Stephen King, she is an avid reader. Karla is a card-carrying cookie-holic, enjoys baking and travel. For more information about Karla or her novels, visit her website.

Website | Blog | Facebook | Twitter

Buy the book at the author’s website.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Comments

  1. What do you find to be the hardest part of writing?

    • The muddle in the middle. I Love fresh ideas and jumping in with both feet, and the characters propel me forward until I get to the middle. Then I worry about how to sustain the action, how to move them forward when “the rules” dictate that they need to be separated. And I HATE to separate them! The middle is also about the time writer’s angst kicks in and you’re sure that what you’re writing is garbage and you start to second guess yourself. Once I get over the hump, all is well with the world again 🙂

  2. The muddle in the middle. I Love fresh ideas and jumping in with both feet, and the characters propel me forward until I get to the middle. Then I worry about how to sustain the action, how to move them forward when “the rules” dictate that they need to be separated. And I HATE to separate them! The middle is also about the time writer’s angst kicks in and you’re sure that what you’re writing is garbage and you start to second guess yourself. Once I get over the hump, all is well with the world again 🙂

  3. I remember annual summer trips to Newport Beach. My mom loved the beach, and although we didn’t live far from the ocean, she liked staying “on the beach” for vacations. My brother and I would save our pennies all year to use at the Balboa Island Fun Zone. Bet you can’t get away with less than a quarter now.

  4. We always did a road trip before school started every year, visit some place different each year, fond memories of those times.

  5. Rita Wray says:

    It was always fun to go visit friends. Nice family outing.

Speak Your Mind

*