The Witchy Worries of Abbie Adams by Rhonda Hayter

The Witchy Worries of Abbie Adams by Rhonda Hayter
Publisher: Dial (Penguin Books)
Genre: Action/Adventure, Contemporary, Paranormal
Age Recommendation: 8 – 12 yrs
Length: Full Length (256 pgs)
Rating: 5 suns
Reviewed by Cholla

Abbie Adams and her family come from a long line of witches, and she’s having a tough time keeping it a secret from her best friend and the rest of her school. Especially the day her little brother morphs into a wolf and tries to eat his teacher.

That’s also the day her father brings home a kitten. Abbie’s been begging for a cat for months, and she falls in love with that fluffy fuzzball right away. But there’s something peculiar about this kitten, and it just might take a witch like Abbie to figure out what it is.

Being in the fifth grade isn’t easy to begin with, but for Abbie Adams its pure torture. First, she has the world’s worst teacher, Ms. Linegar. Then, she can’t tell her very best friend about her secret – that she’s really a witch. Toss that together with being a witch in a world of mortals and you have a recipe for trouble, Abbie Adams style.

Abbie is your normal fifth grader, aside from her magical powers. She has an annoying little brother, the best best friend ever, and parents you can either love or not, depending on the day. She tries her best to do what’s right but sometimes her eagerness gets the better of her. Her world changes forever when her father surprises her with the gift of a little black kitten one afternoon. The arrival of the kitten, Benjamin, is when Abbie’s determination and witchy powers are put to the true test because there’s something special about her new little friend.

The Witchy Worries of Abbie Adams is a great book for kids and adults alike. It takes humor, history, and a mystery and mixes it all together with a bit of mischief on the side. The author has a way with making you laugh while teaching you at the same time. She makes history appealing to young children as well as making her characters real. All throughout the story, Abbie’s internal dialogue lets you know that she’s done things she shouldn’t and that she knows just that – but she also acknowledges the fact that sometimes Abbie just made bad choices and regrets the outcome. And by the end of the book, you’ve solved a problem, learned a bit, and have been taught a bit about being a better child.

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