Screen Shots: Slinky by Willa Okati

Screen Shots: Slinky by Willa Okati
Publisher: Changeling Press
Genre: Contemporary
Length: Short (65 pages)
Other: M/M
Rating: 4 Cherries
Review by: Cactus

Ross, the All-American “boy next door,” is a long-established star of twentysomethingtwinks.com. He’s settled into his comfort zone. Maybe too much so. He needs shaking up and waking up.

Maddox thinks he’s the perfect man for the job. Unfortunately for him, Ross doesn’t. Ross can’t see anything happening between himself and a crazy punk, but he’s wrong. Ross and Maddox have the kind of on-screen and off-screen chemistry no one can deny. It doesn’t hurt that Maddox is amazingly flexible and can do things in bed that’d blow a monk’s mind.

When vanilla meets Rocky Road, it’s a taste sensation and exactly what Ross discovers he’s been craving. But can he find it in himself to take what he and Maddox have to the next level?

Newcomer Maddox is determined to dirty up the boy next door image of Ross and he’ll stop at nothing to achieve his goal. This particular offering focuses on the incredibly flexible newcomer, Maddox, that has entered the group at twentysomethingtwinks.com with his eyes on All-American Boy Ross. Maddox is determined to have Ross, both on camera and off, and before Ross really knows what hit him – he’s too wrapped up in the tattooed, crazy hair, utterly insane Maddox to stop.

In this story, Ross and Maddox are the focus to the point that unlike other stories, neither Ross nor Maddox have sex with anyone else within the pages of the book. Other stories in the series are always careful to show that while relationships may happen, the men still engage in casual sex on camera as their jobs. The point is always hammered home that these men are somehow able to separate sex as their job with close friends versus sex at home with someone you love. Here, that is less the focus and the story instead caters to Ross’ initial confusion and wary attraction to the off the wall antics of Maddox. Maddox slowly draws Ross out of his shell and into more adventurous areas but always with the security that Maddox knows what it means to Ross to take those chances and to be with someone outside of a scene.

This does create a relationship between the two, independent of their work. Also the final scene shows the sheer love of men to be voyeurs, well this group of men anyway. None of them really want to give up their jobs of casual sex – they’re not only good at it but they love what they do. There is no attempt to justify their actions in this story, instead hot sex and a lot of it with some fascinating characters carries the narrative. There are of course scenes with other men from the company that slide in out with quick dialogue and teasing, always reminding the reader of previous matchups and potential ones in the future. These may be harmless, fluff pieces of fun but they are incredibly entertaining and exactly that – fun.

Although the series doesn’t really satisfy my curiosity in establishing how the men differentiate between work and relationships (they’re all friends with benefits), by now I can ignore that qualm and just enjoy the various couplings as they emerge. Fans of the series definitely won’t be disappointed with a return to the lighter, easier tone of this book and will devour the many erotica scenes included. There are several small editing mistakes, misspellings and wrong words, but these are minor and shouldn’t impact the enjoyment of the story. I easily recommend the new book in the series. You’ll definitely want to read about the human slinky, especially the soccer scene.

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