Gone by Michael Grant

Gone by Michael Grant
Publisher: Harper Teen
Genre: Action/Adventure, Contemporary, Paranormal, Sci-Fi/Fantasy, Suspense/Mystery
Length: Full Length (558 pgs)
Age Recommendation: 12+
Rating: 4.5 stars
Reviewed by Peppermint

In the blink of an eye.

Everyone disappears.

Gone.

Everyone except for the young. Teens. Middle schoolers. Toddlers. But not a single adult. No teachers, no cops, no doctors, no parents. Gone, too, are the phones, internet, and television. There is no way to get help.

Hunger threatens. Bullies rule. A sinister creature lurks. Animals are mutating. And the teens themselves are changing, developing new talents—unimaginable, dangerous, deadly powers—that grow stronger by the day.

It’s a terrifying new world. Sides are being chosen and war is imminent.

The first in a breathtaking saga about teens battling each other and their darkest selves, gone is a page-turning thriller that will make you look at the world in a whole new way.

This is an amazingly well written fantasy which will intrigue all ages. Gone encompasses a plot line that is truly unique from any other story I have read. The concept of children having to fend for themselves is not different, but the author incorporated kids developing powers with animals and morphing into something no one has ever seen, and the result is a compelling world.

This story certainly shows how, no matter what the situation, you will always have your heroes, bullies, and followers. The traits of each child, in what is now known as the FAYZ, are intensified when the adults and older children disappear. These types of personality explosions made the story more entertaining and exciting. It helped to enhance the overall plot and antagonistic conflict between the characters.

Sam is the type of child most parents wish they could raise. He may not realize it, but he’s a born leader who others can’t help but follow. I remember these types of individuals from my adolescence, and they’re the ones who go on into adulthood and become successful. If Sam ever realizes how much power over others he truly wields, he’ll be an unstoppable hero and I cannot wait to see what he can achieve in his life.

While Sam makes an excellent hero, Caine and Drake make excellent antagonists. Caine and Drake’s personalities complement one another perfectly. Caine is methodical, charismatic, and cunning, while Drake is psychotic and dangerous. Just like any set of bullies, they can’t even trust each other. This creates a compelling twist to the conflicts within the story, which of course makes it that much more entertaining.

There are a few words in this story that may be inappropriate for younger children. Additionally, because it involves bullies there are some situations that may seem offensive such as when a child is called a “retard”. While some may not agree with this term, it truly does help in understanding the psychology of the children involved in the story.

This is only the first of many stories about the FAYZ and I plan on continuing the series with my daughter. I know my daughter wishes there were a movie coming out because she would love to see it, but we’ll have to be satisfied by reading the next story.

Comments

  1. Wow, this sounds really good!

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