Author Interview: Victoria Blisse

Whipped Cream is pleased to welcome Victoria Blisse, author of The Festive Handbook, which is being released on December 22 from Total E-Bound, just in time for Christmas giving. As well as being an author, she’s also a full-time mum who can be found tidying up, procrastinating online, or baking when she’s not busy writing.

I asked Victoria how she judged what made a good erotic story in her own writing.

“I there are basics you have to adhere to when you’re writing any good story and then there is just one thing to make sure it actually is a good erotic story,” she said. “You need realistic characters, an interesting plot and some action and/or conflict for any story to be worth reading. So I try to make sure I have all those in my stories plus some steamy action for my erotic romances. Erotic does not always mean explicit but to become raunchy romance needs to continue further than the usual kissing and caressing boundaries. There has to be sexual tension and then detailed relief of that tension in my erotic romances.”

She shared with me that she finds a good part of her research incredibly enjoyable and her husband loves to help her out in that area. More specific aspects she either googles or looks up at the library. “So far I haven’t ventured into anything historical mostly because the amount of research involved scares me but you never know what the future may bring,” she told me.

Some of her stories have a basis in reality. “Getting Physical is based on my real life experience of being a curvaceous lady in a gym, and Sweet Surrender is based loosely on a real life experience in my favorite holiday town of Scarborough,” she said. “I try to draw on my own experience a lot to make the story full of life and realism.”

When Victoria writes, she wants all the characters involved to be enjoying what’s going on. “If pain is involved,” she explains, “it’s pleasurable pain and if any kind of force is involved, it is permitted or wanted force. Also, I need a story with my sex these days. I’m not saying it has to be a complex story, but there has got to be a reason for my characters to be getting it on.”

Victoria credits her husband with introducing her to erotic stories and encouraging her to write her own. She’d written from the time she was a child, writing short romance stories as a teenager. “I never really planned to write erotica,” she said, “but from that moment on, I purposefully set about writing hot stories with elements of romance.”

She has written “straight” romance and enjoys writing something different for a change, but told me she finds it more challenging than writing erotic romance. “My dirty mind constantly wants to wander off into the erotic,” she confessed, “but if I am writing pure romance I have to rein it in.”

Victoria told me that she finds chocolate to be very erotic and sensual. “Either melted already or melting from my partner’s body heat, chocolate feels good on the skin and tastes wonderful.” She added, “And, I don’t want any of this high-class, expensive dark stuff either. Give me something milky and cheap, please; it’s the kind of chocolate that satisfies my craving. And it’s good on any body part. Anyone who’s read my story ‘Sweet Surrender’ from my print anthology Curvaceous will know what I mean.”

She also shared with me a secret that might very well get her deported from the UK. “I hate tea,” she admitted. “I can’t drink it, I don’t like the smell of it and I can’t touch a used teabag.”

But, food wise she’ll try anything once. She will eat cold custard in a trifle, but she doesn’t like the taste of hot custard. She told me it was “yucky.”

As far as the difference between Coke and Pepsi, she told me she can tell the difference but she doesn’t really like either one. “I’m a Pepsi max gal myself,” she said. “Though I only treat myself to a can now and then; I’m mostly caffeine free in my life and I feel so much better for it.”

I asked Victoria about her strangest habit and she told me she probably has a million of them, but she did share with me one she picked randomly.

“I have to have things in my pantry or I feel panicky,” she told me. “If I run out of spaghetti or tins of tomatoes I will have to make a special trip out to get a tin or a packet because I will not be able to sleep otherwise. I don’t know why I have this attitude. I think it may be passed down in the genes as my mum and Nanna are just the same. I always know that if I have a full pantry we’ll never starve because I can always pull a meal together from its contents.”

You can read more about Victoria and her works at her website.

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